endorheic

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From endo- (internal) + Ancient Greek ῥέω (rheō, I flow, stream) + -ic.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

endorheic (not comparable)

  1. (of a lake or basin) Internally drained; having no outlet.
    • 1937, Collected Papers - Osborn Zoological Society, Volume 19, Yale University, page 94,
      On the other hand all closed lakes of the kind now being considered must lie in endorheic regions.
    • 1998, Brian Moss, Ecology of Fresh Waters: Man and Medium, Past to Future, Third Edition, Blackwell Publishing, ISBN 978-0-632-03512-0, page 198,
      The catchment-derived water-supply, in evaporating, leaves salts and the basin becomes an endorheic (internally drained) salt lake.
    • 2012, Yeqiao Wang, ed., Remote Sensing of Protected Lands, CRC Press, ISBN 978-1-4398-4187-7, page 318,
      Tibetan lakes in the endorheic basins are dynamic and sensitive to climate change.
    • 2012 January 1, Douglas Larson, “Runaway Devils Lake”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 1, page 46: 
      Devils Lake is where I began my career as a limnologist in 1964, studying the lake’s neotenic salamanders and chironomids, or midge flies. [] The Devils Lake Basin is an endorheic, or closed, basin covering about 9,800 square kilometers in northeastern North Dakota.

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Last modified on 29 January 2014, at 20:58