Last modified on 29 July 2014, at 13:36

entrance

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French entrance (entry)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

entrance (countable and uncountable, plural entrances)

  1. (countable) The action of entering, or going in.
    Her entrance attracted no attention whatsoever.
  2. The act of taking possession, as of property, or of office.
    the entrance of an heir upon his inheritance, or of a magistrate into office
  3. (countable) The place of entering, as a gate or doorway.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, The China Governess[1]:
      ‘It was called the wickedest street in London and the entrance was just here. I imagine the mouth of the road lay between this lamp standard and the second from the next down there.’
    Place your bag by the entrance so that you can find it easily.
  4. (uncountable) The right to go in.
    You'll need a ticket to gain entrance to the museum.
    to give entrance to friends
  5. The entering upon; the beginning, or that with which the beginning is made; the commencement; initiation.
    a difficult entrance into business
    • Shakespeare
      Beware of entrance to a quarrel.
    • Halliwell
      St. Augustine, in the entrance of one of his discourses, makes a kind of apology.
  6. The causing to be entered upon a register, as a ship or goods, at a customhouse; an entering.
    His entrance of the arrival was made the same day.
  7. (nautical) The angle which the bow of a vessel makes with the water at the water line.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ham. Nav. Encyc. to this entry?)
  8. (nautical) The bow, or entire wedgelike forepart of a vessel, below the water line.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From en- + trance (daze)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

entrance (third-person singular simple present entrances, present participle entrancing, simple past and past participle entranced)

  1. (transitive) To delight and fill with wonder.
    The children were immediately entranced by all the balloons.
  2. (transitive) To put into a trance.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

entrance

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of entrançar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of entrançar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of entrançar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of entrançar