excelsior

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin excelsior, comparative of excelsus (high). The name of the stuffing material was originally a trademark.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

excelsior (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Loftier, yet higher; ever upward

NounEdit

excelsior (uncountable)

  1. Stuffing material (as for furniture and mattresses) made of slender, curled wood shavings, as a substitute for hair.
    • 1942, Elliot Paul, The Last Time I Saw Paris, Sickle Moon 2001, p. 91:
      These little mangers, with baby dolls representing Jesus, porcelean Josephs and Marys, wide-eyed cows of papier-mâché, and excelsior for straw, were purchased by pious parents for well-behaved children at Christmas-tide.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From excelsus (elevated, lofty).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

excelsior (comparative of excelsus)

  1. higher, loftier, more elevated

InflectionEdit

Third declension, comparative variant.

Number Singular Plural
Case \ Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative excelsior excelsius excelsiōrēs excelsiōra
genitive excelsiōris excelsiōris excelsiōrum excelsiōrum
dative excelsiōrī excelsiōrī excelsiōribus excelsiōribus
accusative excelsiōrem excelsius excelsiōrēs excelsiōra
ablative excelsiōre excelsiōre excelsiōribus excelsiōribus
vocative excelsior excelsius excelsiōrēs excelsiōra
Last modified on 20 March 2014, at 15:14