brilliant

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French brillant, from Medieval Latin as if *berilare (to sparkle like a beryl or other precious stone), from Latin berillus, beryllus (a beryl, gem, eyeglass), from Ancient Greek βήρυλλος (bērullos, beryl).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brilliant (comparative more brilliant, superlative most brilliant)

  1. Shining brightly.
    the brilliant lights along the promenade
  2. (of a colour) Both bright and saturated.
    butterflies with brilliant blue wings
  3. (of a voice or sound) having a sharp, clear tone
  4. Of surpassing excellence.
    The actor's performance in the play was simply brilliant.
  5. Magnificent or wonderful.
  6. Highly intelligent.
    She is a brilliant scientist.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

brilliant (plural brilliants)

  1. A finely cut gemstone, especially a diamond, having many facets.
    • Alexander Pope
      This snuffbox — on the hinge see brilliants shine.
    • 1891, Arthur Conan Doyle, A Case of Identity
      “And the ring?” I asked, glancing at a remarkable brilliant which sparkled upon his finger.
  2. (printing) A small size of type.
  3. A kind of cotton goods, figured on the weaving.

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

French brillant.

NounEdit

brilliant

  1. brilliant.

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

Last modified on 31 March 2014, at 15:01