Last modified on 4 July 2014, at 21:26

flatter

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

flat +‎ -er

NounEdit

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flatter (plural flatters)

  1. A type of set tool used by blacksmiths.
  2. A flat-faced fulling hammer.
  3. A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for drawing flat strips such as watch springs.
  4. Someone who flattens, purposely or accidently. Also flattener.
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

flatter

  1. comparative form of flat: more flat

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French flatter (to flatter, to caress with the flat of the hand), from Old French flater (to deceive by concealing the truth, to stroke with the palm of the hand), from Frankish *flat (palm, flat of the hand), from Proto-Germanic *flatą, *flatō (palm, sole), *flataz (flat), from Proto-Indo-European *plÁt-, *pele-, *plet-, *plāk- (flat, broad, plain). Cognate with Old High German flazza (palm, flat of the hand), Old High German flaz (level, flat), Old Saxon flat (flat), Old Norse flatr (flat) (whence English flat), Old Frisian flet, flette (dwelling, house), Old English flet, flett (ground floor, dwelling). More at flat.

VerbEdit

flatter (third-person singular simple present flatters, present participle flattering, simple past and past participle flattered) (transitive and intransitive)

  1. to compliment someone, often insincerely and sometimes to win favour
    • Bible, Proverbs xxix. 5
      A man that flattereth his neighbour, spreadeth a net for his feet.
    • Prescott
      Others he flattered by asking their advice.
  2. to enhance someone's vanity by praising them
  3. to portray something to advantage.
    Her portrait flatters her.
  4. to convey notions of the facts that are believed to be favorable to the hearer without certainty of the truthfulness of the notions conveyed.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French flatter (to flatter, to caress with the flat of the hand), from Old French flater (to deceive by concealing the truth, to stroke with the palm of the hand), from Frankish *flat (palm, flat of the hand), from Proto-Germanic *flatą, *flatō (palm, sole), *flataz (flat), from Proto-Indo-European *plÁt-, *pele-, *plet-, *plāk- (flat, broad, plain). Cognate with Old High German flazza (palm, flat of the hand), Old High German flaz (level, flat), Old Saxon flat (flat), Old Norse flatr (flat) (whence English flat), Old Frisian flet, flette (dwelling, house), Old English flet, flett (ground floor, dwelling). More at flat, flétrir.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

flatter

  1. to flatter

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

flatter

  1. to flatter

ConjugationEdit

ca:flatter

cs:flatter cy:flatter da:flatter et:flatter el:flatter es:flatter fr:flatter ko:flatter hy:flatter io:flatter it:flatter kn:flatter li:flatter hu:flatter mg:flatter ml:flatter my:flatter no:flatter pl:flatter sm:flatter simple:flatter fi:flatter sv:flatter tl:flatter ta:flatter te:flatter chr:flatter vi:flatter zh:flatter