Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 10:20

hoar

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hore, from Old English hār (hoar, hoary, grey, old), from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱēy(w)-, *ḱyē(w)- (grey). Cognate with German hehr (noble, sublime).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hoar (plural hoars)

  1. A white or greyish-white colour.
    hoar colour:    
  2. Hoariness; antiquity.
    • Burke
      Covered with the awful hoar of innumerable ages.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hoar (not comparable)

  1. Of a white or greyish-white colour.
    • Spenser
      hoar waters
  2. (poetic) Hoarily bearded.
    • 1847 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Evangeline, A Tale of Acadie
      This is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks,
      Bearded with moss, and in garments green, indistinct in the twilight,
      Stand like Druids of eld, with voices sad and prophetic,
      Stand like harpers hoar, with beards that rest on their bosoms.
    • Byron
      old trees with trunks all hoar
  3. (obsolete) Musty; mouldy; stale.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

hoar (third-person singular simple present hoars, present participle hoaring, simple past and past participle hoared)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To become mouldy or musty.

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

hoar

  1. indefinite plural of ho

VerbEdit

hoar

  1. present tense of hoa.