Last modified on 1 January 2015, at 17:36

irritate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin irritatus, past participle of irritare (to excite, irritate, incite, stimulate)

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

irritate (third-person singular simple present irritates, present participle irritating, simple past and past participle irritated)

  1. (transitive) To provoke impatience, anger, or displeasure.
    • 1915, Mrs. Belloc Lowndes, The Lodger, Ch.I:
      Thanks to that penny he had just spent so recklessly [on a newspaper] he would pass a happy hour, taken, for once, out of his anxious, despondent, miserable self. It irritated him shrewdly to know that these moments of respite from carking care would not be shared with his poor wife, with careworn, troubled Ellen.
  2. (transitive) To introduce irritability or irritation in.
  3. (intransitive) To cause or induce displeasure or irritation.
  4. (transitive) To induce pain in (all or part of a body or organism).
  5. (obsolete) To render null and void.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Archbishop Bramhall to this entry?)

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ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

irritate f pl

  1. feminine plural of irritato

VerbEdit

irritate

  1. second-person plural present of irritare
  2. third-person singular imperative of irritare
  3. feminine plural past participle of irritare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

irrītāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of irrītō