maquis

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From French maquis, from Corsican macchia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

maquis (uncountable)

  1. Dense Mediterranean coastal scrub. [from 19th c.]
    • 2007 May 27, Alida Becker, “Season in the Sun”, New York Times:
      The older man claims to find a measure of peace in Corsica’s wild landscape, and as Mitchell explores the foothills of maquis, fragrant with “the sharp resinous smell of laurel rose and thyme,” he too succumbs.
  2. The French resistance movement during World War II, or other similar movements elsewhere. [from 1940s]
    • 1977, Alistair Horne, A Savage War of Peace, New York Review Books 2006, p. 75:
      By this time O.S. membership numbered some 4,500, and many of those who escaped imprisonment either fled abroad or formed the nucleus of a growing maquis in the more inaccessible parts of the country.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Corsican macchia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

maquis m (plural maquis)

  1. macchia, Mediterranean brush.
  2. thicket
  3. (figuratively) resistance, underground (movement during World War II)

Derived termsEdit

Last modified on 24 January 2014, at 17:59