mensch

See also: Mensch

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Yiddish מענטש (mentsh, an honorable person), from Old High German mennisko (man). The spelling mensch was influenced by German Mensch; compare the alternative spellings.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mensch (plural mensches or menschen)

  1. A person (chiefly male) of strength, integrity, and honor or compassion.
    • 1960, The Apartment:
      Doctor Dreyfuss [to C. C. Baxter]: Be a mensch!
    • 2005, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, Bloomsbury Publishing, page 428:
      Lionel Kessler, relaxing perhaps on a Louis Quinze day bed, garlanded all round with lines of beauty, seeing welcome proof that his clever maligned young friend was a mensch.
    • 2008 December 28, George Solomon, “My Little Red Book”, The Washington Post, page D01:
      Olie Kolzig: Goalie for the Washington Capitals who spent most of 16 seasons between the pipes for the team until being released in 2008. Had the longest career of any Capital. Now plays for Tampa Bay. The ultimate mensch, in my book.
    • 2008, Dwight S. Huggins, Into the Greenhouse Vol. VI: Dreams (ISBN 1467050873):
      She was an Amerindian, and stout. She was a real mensch, [] a hard working person, who took pride in her job, which was to spray from an aerosol can a particular base.
  2. A gentleman.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mensch m, n (plural menschen, diminutive menschje n)

  1. Obsolete spelling of mens.

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Coined as a gender-neutral alternative to man (one), because that word derives from Mann (adult male). Compare the pronoun frau, but notice that both have so far not become common and are used mainly by feminist writers/speakers. Compare also the use of they (vs she vs he) in English to refer to a generic or specific person whose gender is unknown.

PronounEdit

mensch

  1. (indefinite, rare) one, they (indefinite third-person singular pronoun)
    • 2010, Sandra Glammeier, Zwischen Verleiblichter Herrschaft und Widerstand (ISBN 3531927000), page 92:
      Dies ist nach Landweer (1999: 45) aber nur möglich, wenn mensch sich irgendeine noch so vage Verantwortung dafür zuschreibt, Objekt von Demütigung geworden zu sein.
Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 00:52