Last modified on 20 August 2014, at 23:56
See also: mid- and MID

EnglishEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English, from Old English mid (with, in conjunction with, in company with, together with, into the presence of, through, by means of, by, among, in, at (time), in the sight of, opinion of, preposition), from Proto-Germanic *midi (with), from Proto-Indo-European *medʰi-, *meta (with). Cognate with North Frisian mits (with), Dutch met (with), Low German mid (with), German mit (with), Danish med (with), Icelandic með (with), Ancient Greek μετά (metá, among, between, with), Albanian me (with, together), Sanskrit स्मत् (smat, together, at the same time).

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. (obsolete) With.
  2. Amid.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English mid, midde, from Old English midd (mid, middle, midway), from Proto-Germanic *midjaz (mid, middle, adjective), from Proto-Indo-European *médʰyos (between, in the middle, middle). Cognate with Dutch mits (provided that), German mitte (center, middle, mean), Icelandic miðr (middle, adjective), Latin medius (middle, medium). See also middle.

AdjectiveEdit

mid (not comparable)

  1. Denoting the middle part.
    mid ocean
  2. Occupying a middle position; middle.
    mid finger
    mid hour of night
  3. (linguistics) Made with a somewhat elevated position of some certain part of the tongue, in relation to the palate; midway between the high and the low; said of certain vowel sounds; as, a (ale), / (/ll), / (/ld).
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English mid, midde, from Old English midd (midst, middle, noun), from Proto-Germanic *midją, *midjǭ, *midjô (middle, center) < *midjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *medhy- (between, in the middle, middle), *medʰyo-. Cognate with German Mitte (center, middle, midst), Danish midje (middle), Icelandic midja (middle). See also median, Latin medianus.

NounEdit

mid (plural mids)

  1. (archaic) middle
    • Shakespeare
      About the mid of night come to my tent.

AnagramsEdit


German Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (in some dialects) mit
  • (Low Prussian) möt

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon mid, from Proto-Germanic *midi (“with”), from Proto-Indo-European *medʰi-, *meta (“with”). Cognate with North Frisian mits (“with”), Dutch met (“with”), German mit (“with”). For more, see English mid.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. (in some dialects) with

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

mid

  1. rafsi of minde.

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Carried over from Old English mid.

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. with

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to Old Saxon mid, Old High German mit, Old Norse með.

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. with

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *midi.

PrepositionEdit

mid

  1. with

AdverbEdit

mid

  1. with, together, along