See also: œ, Oe, OE, 'oe, and

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Danish ø.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oe (plural oes)

  1. (literary or poetic, rare) A small island.
    • 1817, Sir Walter Scott, Harold the Dauntless, canto III:
      I love my father's northern land, / Where the dark pine-trees grow, / And the bold Baltic's echoing strand / Looks o'er each grassy oe.

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

oe

  1. third-person singular present indicative of oír
  2. second-person singular imperative of oír

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish úa, from Proto-Celtic *pavio-s, from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂u-.

NounEdit

oe m, f (genitive oe, plural oeghyn)

  1. grandchild

Derived termsEdit


SardinianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hodiē.

AdverbEdit

oe

  1. today

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Scottish Gaelic ogha, odha.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oe (plural oes)

  1. (archaic) grandchild (especially illegitimate)
    • 1833, John Galt, The Howdie: An Autobiography,
      She told me that she was afraid her oe had brought home her wark, and that she didna doubt they would need the sleight of my hand.
Last modified on 24 December 2013, at 13:25