Last modified on 19 October 2014, at 10:08

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English owen, from Old English āgan, from Proto-Germanic *aiganą, from Proto-Indo-European *eik- (ability, possession). See also own, ought.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

owe (third-person singular simple present owes, present participle owing, simple past and past participle owed)

  1. To be under an obligation to give something back to someone or to perform some action for someone.
    • 1854, Dickens, Hard Times, Chapter 7:
      He inherited a fair fortune from his uncle, but owed it all before he came into it, and spent it twice over immediately afterwards.
  2. To have debt, to be in debt.

Usage notesEdit

  • The original past tense form was ought, which during Middle English began to be used with indefinite signification and has become a distinct verb. The original past participle has become the adjective own.

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit