prorogue

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prōrogō (prolong, defer)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

prorogue (third-person singular simple present prorogues, present participle proroguing, simple past and past participle prorogued)

  1. (obsolete) To prolong or extend. [15th-18th c.]
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, II.2.6.iv:
      Mirth [...] prorogues life, whets the wit, makes the body young, lively, and fit for any manner of employment.
  2. (transitive, now rare) To defer. [from 15th c.]
  3. (transitive) To suspend (a parliamentary session) or to discontinue the meetings of (an assembly, parliament etc.) without formally ending the session. [from 15th c.]
    • 1932, Maurice Baring, chapter 20, Friday's Business[1]:
      The King settled to prorogue Parliament until the Christmas holidays, and to do nothing else for the present.

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Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 20:04