Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 16:42

revenant

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

19th century. From French revenant, the present participle of revenir (to return). Compare revenue.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

revenant (plural revenants)

  1. Someone who returns from a long absence.
    • 1886, Mrs Lynn Linton, Paston Carew viii, as cited in the Oxford English Dictionary, volume 8 part 1, published 1914, page 595:
      They would not visit this undesirable revenant with his insolent wealth and discreditable origin.
    • 1895 August 31, Daily News 4/7, as cited in the Oxford English Dictionary, volume 8 part 1, published 1914, page 595:
      The undergraduates, our fogey revenant observes, look much as they did.., in outward aspect.
    • 2008, Andrew Cusack, Wanderer in 19th-Century German Literature, Camden House, ISBN 978-1-57113-386-1, page 91:
      From this moment on, the hero's fate is sealed; an attempt to reestablish himself in human society, though initially successful, inevitably fails. The stone tablet exerts an invincible fascination over the revenant, who becomes so withdrawn that his father implores him: []
  2. A person or thing reborn.
    • 2007, John Burrow, A History of Histories, Penguin 2009, page 184:
      Sometimes [] semi-identifications could be made on the basis of names. Henry VII's son Arthur was hailed as a revenant in this way.
  3. A supernatural being that returns from the dead; a zombie or ghost.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

revenant (comparative more revenant, superlative most revenant)

  1. Used as an adjective.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

revenant

  1. Present participle of revenir.

NounEdit

revenant m (plural revenants)

  1. A supernatural being that returns from the dead; a zombie or ghost.

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit