Last modified on 9 July 2014, at 01:14

slinks

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

slinks

  1. third-person singular simple present indicative form of slink

LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a (still dialectally attested) verb slinkt (to creep, to crawl, to go slowly) (compare Lithuanian sliñkti (to crawl slowly)), from Proto-Baltic *slink-, from a reduced grade of Proto-Indo-European *slenk- (to turn, to twist, to wind; to drag oneself, to creep, to crawl) (perhaps in confluence with Proto-Indo-European *(s)lēg-, *(s)leg- (to be languid)). The meaning went from “to crawl, to creep” to “to move slowly, lazily,” “to be lazy,” or, for the adjective slinks, from “slow-moving” to “lazy.” Cognates include Lithuanian sliñkas.[1]

PronunciationEdit

Headset icon.svg This entry needs audio files. If you have a microphone, please record some and upload them. (For audio required quickly, visit WT:APR.)

AdjectiveEdit

slinks (def. slinkais, comp. slinkāks, sup. visslinkākais; adv. slinki)

  1. lazy (who is given to idleness, who typically does not like, is reluctant to work, to do something)
    slinks darbinieks, talciniekslazy employee, helper
    slinks strādnieks, skolniekslazy worker, schoolchild
    slinks zirgslazy horse

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “slinks” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (Rīga: AVOTS) ISBN: 9984-700-12-7.