Last modified on 20 October 2014, at 22:26

spouse

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman espus, espuse and Old French espos, espose and by aphasis from Latin spōnsus (bridegroom), spōnsa (bride), from spondere (to vow, to pledge), from Proto-Indo-European *spend-.

Cognate to espouse, spondee, sponsor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spouse (plural spouses)

  1. A person's husband or wife.
    People should treat their spouses with respect.
    • Spenser
      At last such grace I found, and means I wrought, / That I that lady to my spouse had won.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spouse (third-person singular simple present spouses, present participle spousing, simple past and past participle spoused)

  1. (dated) To wed; to espouse.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act III, Scene II, verses 212-214
      Do you stand possess’d
      Of any proof against the honourableness
      Of Lady Auranthe, our new-spoused daughter?

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AnagramsEdit