See also: cârd

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Some playing cards
A business card
An identity card
A network card (electronic device inserted into a computer)

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English carde (playing card), from Old French carte, from Latin charta, from Ancient Greek χάρτης (chartēs, paper, papyrus).

NounEdit

card (countable and uncountable, plural cards)

  1. A playing card.
  2. (in the plural) Any game using playing cards; a card game.
    He played cards with his friends.
  3. A resource or an argument, used to achieve a purpose.
    The government played the Orange card to get support for their Ireland policy.
    He accused them of playing the race card.
  4. Any flat, normally rectangular piece of stiff paper, plastic etc.
  5. (obsolete) A map or chart.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vii:
      As pilot well expert in perilous waue, / Vpon his card and compas firmes his eye [...].
  6. (informal) An amusing but slightly foolish person.
    • 1918, Siegfried Sassoon, The General
      "He's a cheery old card," muttered Harry to Jack
      As they slogged up to Arras with rifle and pack.
      . . .
      But he did for them both by his plan of attack.
    • 2007, Meredith Gran, Octopus Pie #71: Deadpan
      MAREK: But really the deadpan is key. You can essentially trick people into laughing at nothing.
      EVE: Oh, Marek, you card.
  7. A list of scheduled events or of performers or contestants.
    What’s on the card for tonight?
  8. (cricket) A tabular presentation of the key statistics of an innings or match: batsmen’s scores and how they were dismissed, extras, total score and bowling figures.
  9. (computing) A removable electronic device that may be inserted into a powered electronic device to provide additional capability.
    He needed to replace the card his computer used to connect to the internet.
  10. A greeting card.
    She gave her neighbors a card congratulating them on their new baby.
  11. A business card.
    The realtor gave me her card so I could call if I had any questions about buying a house.
  12. (television) This word needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    title card
    test card
  13. (dated) A published note, containing a brief statement, explanation, request, expression of thanks, etc.
    to put a card in the newspapers
  14. (dated) A printed programme.
  15. (dated, figuratively, by extension) An attraction or inducement.
    This will be a good card for the last day of the fair.
  16. A paper on which the points of the compass are marked; the dial or face of the mariner's compass.
    • Shakespeare
      All the quarters that they know / I' the shipman's card.
  17. (weaving) A perforated pasteboard or sheet-metal plate for warp threads, making part of the Jacquard apparatus of a loom.
  18. An indicator card.
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

card (third-person singular simple present cards, present participle carding, simple past and past participle carded)

  1. To check IDs, especially against a minimum age requirement.
    They have to card anybody who looks 21 or younger.
    I heard you don't get carded at the other liquor store.
  2. (dated) To play cards.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French carde, from Old Provençal carda, deverbal from cardar, from Late Latin *carito, from Latin carrere (to comb with a card), from Proto-Indo-European *ker, *sker (to cut).

NounEdit

card (countable and uncountable, plural cards)

  1. (uncountable, dated) Material with embedded short wire bristles.
  2. (dated, textiles) A comb- or brush-like device or tool to raise the nap on a fabric.
  3. (textiles) A hand-held tool formed similarly to a hairbrush but with bristles of wire or other rigid material. It is used principally with raw cotton, wool, hair, or other natural fibers to prepare these materials for spinning into yarn or thread on a spinning wheel, with a whorl or other hand-held spindle. The card serves to untangle, clean, remove debris from, and lay the fibers straight.
  4. (dated, textiles) A machine for disentangling the fibres of wool prior to spinning.
  5. A roll or sliver of fibre (as of wool) delivered from a carding machine.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

card (third-person singular simple present cards, present participle carding, simple past and past participle carded)

  1. (textiles) To use a carding device to disentangle the fibres of wool prior to spinning.
  2. To scrape or tear someone’s flesh using a metal comb, as a form of torture.
  3. (transitive) To comb with a card; to cleanse or disentangle by carding.
    to card a horse
  4. (obsolete, transitive, figuratively) To clean or clear, as if by using a card.
    • (Can we date this quote?) T. Shelton
      This book [must] be carded and purged.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To mix or mingle, as with an inferior or weaker article.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Greene
      You card your beer, if your guests begin to be drunk, half small, half strong.
TranslationsEdit

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin carduus.

NounEdit

card m (plural cards)

  1. thistle

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

card m (invariable)

  1. card (identification, financial, SIM etc (but not playing card))

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 03:57