Last modified on 1 June 2014, at 21:52

throw out

See also: throw-out

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

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PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

throw out (plural throw outs)

  1. Alternative form of throw-out.

VerbEdit

throw out (third-person singular simple present throws out, present participle throwing out, simple past threw out, past participle thrown out)

  1. (idiomatic) To discard; to dispense with something; to throw away.
    Just throw out that pen if it doesn't write anymore.
    They decided to throw out the idea because it would have been too expensive.
    • 2012 May 27, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992)”, The Onion AV Club:
      The episode also opens with an inspired bit of business for Homer, who blithely refuses to acquiesce to an elderly neighbor’s utterly reasonable request that he help make the process of selling her house easier by wearing pants when he gallivants about in front of windows, throw out his impressive collection of rotting Jack-O-Lanterns from previous Halloweens and take out his garbage, as it’s attracting wildlife (cue moose and Northern Exposure theme song).
  2. (idiomatic) To dismiss or expel someone from any longer performing duty or attending somewhere.
    The board threw the man out, because he wouldn't cooperate and agree with their plans to remodernize the facility.
    The ushers threw the woman out of the auditorium, because she kept shouting out insults to the guest of honor when he made his speech.
  3. (idiomatic) To offer an idea for consideration.
    Let me throw this out there – how about if we make the igloo out of butter? Would that work?