Last modified on 25 July 2014, at 23:33

utan

See also: utan- and után

Bau BidayuhEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-North Sarawak, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qutan, from Proto-Austronesian *quCaN.

NounEdit

utan

  1. forest (dense collection of trees)

MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayic *hutan, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic *hutan, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *hutan, from Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi *hutan, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qutan (compare Maori uta), from Proto-Austronesian *quCaN.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

utan (Jawi spelling اوتن)

  1. Misspelling of hutan.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse útan.

PrepositionEdit

utan

  1. without (not having)
    Eg er utan pengane mine.
    I am without my money.

ReferencesEdit

ConjunctionEdit

utan

  1. unless, without
    Eg gidd ikkje å gjera dette utan at du tek eit tak sjølv.
    I'll not bother to do this unless you lend a helping hand.

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ūt.

AdverbEdit

ūtan

  1. from without
  2. on the outside

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

utan

  1. without
    Att inte beakta finansmarknadens djuppsykologiska dimensioner uppfattas mer och mer som att spela Hamlet utan prinsen av Danmark.
    To not take into account the deep psychological dimensions of the finance market is regarded more and more like playing Hamlet without the prince of Denmark.

ConjunctionEdit

utan

  1. but
    Huset är inte rött utan blått
    The house is not red but blue

Usage notesEdit

  • The difference in use between utan and men, which also translates but, is a matter of whether the content of the "but" clause is considered as something contrary to the content of the preceding clause or considered as something that partly has a similar meaning or function in the context for those involved. "That dog is not black but dark brown" would be translated "Den hunden är inte svart utan mörkbrun" if, for example, the dog was expected or preferred to be black and especially if a dark brown dog means something different than a black one to the persons involved in the linguistic situation - they could be people wanting to buy a black dog and for whom no other colours will do. The same sentence would be translated "Den hunden är inte svart men mörkbrun" if the expectations or preferations of the context is for the colour to be dark (primary relevance) and most likely black (secondary relevance). People preferably wanting a black dog but who have decided that another dark colour could be acceptable as well could use this version of the sentence, since, to them, black dogs and darkish brown dogs both have a positive meaning in this context. To the people for whom only a black dog was acceptable brown dogs had a negative meaning or, at least, lack of positive meaning in the situation described. This usage note, however, does not fully explain the difference between men and utan as translations for but. However, when utan is used there is always a negation in the preceding main clause. If there is no negation there, the normal translation of the English conjunction but is always men.

Uab MetoEdit

NounEdit

utan; utnin, utan sin, ut’in, ut kin pl

  1. vegetable