Last modified on 6 June 2014, at 19:52
See also: UT, út, ût, üt, ut-, -uț, and -ut-

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ut, from the first word of ut queant laxis, a medieval hymn, where the first word in each line was taken to use for the names of the syllables of sol-fa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ut (plural uts)

  1. (music, dated) Syllable (formerly) used in solfège to represent the first note of a major scale.

Usage notesEdit

  • In solfège, ut has been replaced by do.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ut m (plural ut)

  1. (music) ut (do) the note 'C'.

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

ūt

  1. Romanization of 𐌿𐍄

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

ConjunctionEdit

ut (followed by the subjunctive)

  1. that, so that, to, in order to, in order that

Etymology 2Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

ConjunctionEdit

ut (followed by the indicative)

  1. as, just as
    • 45 BC, Cicero, Tusculanae Disputationes, Book II.42
      Ut ager, quamvis fertilis, sine cultura fructuosus esse non potest, sic sine doctrina animus.
      Just as the field, however fertile, without cultivation cannot be fruitful, likewise the soul without education.
Related termsEdit

MeriamEdit

NounEdit

ut

  1. sleep

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse út, from Proto-Germanic *ūt.

PrepositionEdit

ut

  1. out (direction)

InterjectionEdit

ut

  1. get out!

See alsoEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse út, from Proto-Germanic *ūt.

PrepositionEdit

ut

  1. out (direction)

InterjectionEdit

ut

  1. get out!

See alsoEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ūt, from Proto-Indo-European *ud. Cognate with Old Saxon ūt (Dutch uit), Old High German ūz (German aus), Old Norse út (Swedish ut), Gothic 𐌿𐍄 (ut).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ūt

  1. out

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ūt, whence also Old English, Old Dutch, and Old Frisian ūt, Old High German ūz, Old Norse út.

AdverbEdit

ūt

  1. out

PrepositionEdit

ūt

  1. out of

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse út, from Proto-Germanic *ūt.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ut (not comparable)

  1. out (direction)

InterjectionEdit

ut

  1. get out!

PostpositionEdit

ut

  1. from a certain point within a timespan until the end of that timespan is passed (and further in time)

Usage notesEdit

  • året ut
    Until the end of this year (and possibly further)
  • Detta resultat stod sig matchen ut
    This result lasted for the rest of the game,
    This result lasted until the game was over (and further, is still valid unless something else is known)

See alsoEdit


TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ut (definite accusative udu, plural utlar)

  1. lute

DeclensionEdit