Last modified on 3 August 2014, at 16:54

vengeance

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French venger (avenge)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vengeance (countable and uncountable, plural vengeances)

  1. Revenge taken for an insult, injury, or other wrong.
    • 2000, Gladiator (film):
      My name is Maximus Decimus Meridius, commander of the Armies of the North; General of the Felix Legions; loyal servant to the true emperor, Marcus Aurelius; father to a murdered son; husband to a murdered wife; and I will have my vengeance, in this life or the next.
  2. Desire for revenge.
    • c. 1856, Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit:
      Thereupon full of anger, full of jealousy, full of vengeance, she forms [] a scheme of retribution, []
    • 2008, Jean Harvey Baker, Mary Todd Lincoln: A Biography (ISBN 0393075680):
      If her husband was all forgiveness, asking the bands to play “Dixie,” she was full of vengeance []
    • 2011, James Calloway, Black America, Not in This America (ISBN 1462868576):
      Are they full of vengeance[?], because they say that people with vengeance in their hearts must dig two graves, one for their enemy and the other for themselves.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

venger +‎ -ance

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vengeance f (plural vengeances)

  1. revenge, vengeance

External linksEdit