Belarusian

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Belarusian Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Belarusian зубъ (zub), from Old East Slavic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ), from Proto-Slavic *zǫbъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *źámbas,[1] from Proto-Indo-European *ǵómbʰos. Cognate to Old Church Slavonic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [zup]
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

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зуб (zubm inan (genitive зу́ба, nominative plural зу́бы, genitive plural зубо́ў)

  1. tooth

Declension

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References

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  1. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, →ISSN, page 549

Carpathian Rusyn

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Etymology

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From Old East Slavic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ), from Proto-Slavic *zǫbъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *źámbas,[1] from Proto-Indo-European *ǵómbʰos. Cognate to Old Church Slavonic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ).

Noun

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зуб (zubm

  1. tooth
    Розболіл мя зуб, а неє дентисты, його обовязкы выполнят кухар!.
    Rozbolil mja zub, a neje dentystŷ, joho obovjazkŷ vŷpolnjat kuxar!.
    I had a toothache, but we did not have a dentist, the duties of the doctor were performed by the cook!

References

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  1. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, →ISSN, page 549

Russian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old East Slavic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ), from Proto-Slavic *zǫbъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *źámbas,[1] from Proto-Indo-European *ǵómbʰos. Cognate to Old Church Slavonic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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зуб (zubm inan (genitive зу́ба, nominative plural зу́бы or зу́бья*, genitive plural зубо́в or зу́бьев*, relational adjective зубно́й, diminutive зубо́к or зу́бчик, augmentative зуби́ще) (* Technical.)

  1. tooth
    драть зу́быdratʹ zúbyto pull out teeth (colloquial)
  2. (technical) tooth, cog, dent

Declension

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Derived terms

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See also

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References

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  1. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, →ISSN, page 549

Serbo-Croatian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *zǫbъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *źámbas,[1] from Proto-Indo-European *ǵómbʰos. Cognate to Old Church Slavonic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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зу̑б m (Latin spelling zȗb)

  1. tooth

Declension

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Derived terms

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References

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  1. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, →ISSN, page 549

Further reading

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  • зуб” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Ukrainian

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Ukrainian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia uk

Etymology

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From Old Ukrainian зубъ (zub), from Old East Slavic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ), from Proto-Slavic *zǫbъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *źámbas,[1] from Proto-Indo-European *ǵómbʰos. Cognate to Old Church Slavonic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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зуб (zubm inan (genitive зу́ба, nominative plural зу́би, genitive plural зубі́в)

  1. tooth

Declension

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Noun

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зуб (zubm inan (genitive зу́ба, nominative plural зу́би or зу́б'я, genitive plural зубі́в or зу́б'їв)

  1. tooth, projection, cog (on a rake, comb, gear, etc.)

Declension

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Derived terms

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References

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  1. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, →ISSN, page 549

Further reading

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