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EnglishEdit

 
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a tooth

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English tooth, from Old English tōþ (tooth), from Proto-Germanic *tanþs (tooth), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dónts (tooth). Cognate with Scots tuth, tuith (tooth), North Frisian toth, tos (tooth), Dutch tand (tooth), German Zahn (tooth), Danish and Swedish tand (tooth), Norwegian tann (tooth), Icelandic tönn (tooth), Welsh dant (tooth), Latin dēns (tooth), Lithuanian dantìs (tooth), Ancient Greek ὀδούς (odoús)/ὀδών (odṓn, tooth), Armenian ատամ (atam), Persian دندان (dandân), Sanskrit दत् (dát, tooth). Related to tusk.

PronunciationEdit


NounEdit

tooth (plural teeth)

  1. A hard, calcareous structure present in the mouth of many vertebrate animals, generally used for eating.
  2. A sharp projection on the blade of a saw or similar implement.
  3. A projection on the edge of a gear that meshes with similar projections on adjacent gears, or on the circumference of a cog that engages with a chain.
  4. (zoology) A projection or point in other parts of the body resembling the tooth a vertebrate animal.
    • 1832, Constantine Samuel Rafinesque, A monograph of the fluviatile bivalve shells of the river Ohio, page 43:
      Species XXXVI. Obliquaria bullata— (Unio bullata) [] Found at the falls of Ohio; rare; breadth almost two inches; cardinal and lamellar teeth like preceding species; apices rounded, decorticated, but not truncated
  5. (botany) A pointed projection from the margin of a leaf.
  6. (animation) The rough surface of some kinds of cel or other films that allows better adhesion of artwork.
  7. (figuratively) taste; palate
    I have a sweet tooth: I love sugary treats.
    • 1693, John Dryden, “The Third Satire of Aulus Persius Flaccus”, in The Satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis:
      These are not dishes for thy dainty tooth
  8. (algebraic geometry) An irreducible component of a comb that intersects the handle in exactly one point, that point being distinct from the unique point of intersection for any other tooth of the comb.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

tooth (third-person singular simple present tooths, present participle toothing, simple past and past participle toothed)

  1. To provide or furnish with teeth.
    • 1815, William Wordsworth, “The Brothers”:
      His Wife sate near him, teasing matted wool, / While, from the twin cards toothed with glittering wire / He fed the spindle []
  2. To indent; to jag.
    to tooth a saw
  3. To lock into each other, like gear wheels.
    • 1678, Joseph Moxon, Mechanick Exercises: or the Doctrine of Handy-works[1], page 260:
      Whereas if the Header of one side of the wall, toothed as much as the Stretcher on the other side, it would be a stronger Toothing, and the joints of the Header on one side, would be in the middle of the Headers of the course they lie upon of the other side

AnagramsEdit