HebrewEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Semitic *dād (paternal uncle)

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

דּוֹד (dodm (plural indefinite דּוֹדִים‎, plural construct דּוֹדֵי־‎, feminine counterpart דּוֹדָה‎)

  1. (A person's) uncle: a parent's sibling, or an aunt's husband.
    • Leviticus 20:20, with translation of the King James Version:
      כוְאִ֗ישׁ אֲשֶׁ֤ר יִשְׁכַּב֙ אֶת־דֹּ֣דָת֔וֹ עֶרְוַ֥ת דֹּד֖וֹ גִּלָּ֑ה חֶטְאָ֥ם יִשָּׂ֖אוּ עֲרִירִ֥ים יָמֻֽתוּ
      And if a man shall lie with his uncle's wife, he hath uncovered his uncle's nakedness: they shall bear their sin; they shall die childless.
    • c. 300 B.C.E., Esther 2:7, with translation of the King James Version:
      וַיְהִי אֹמֵן אֶת־הֲדַסָּה הִיא אֶסְתֵּר בַּת־דֹּדוֹ כִּי אֵין לָהּ אָב וָאֵם []
      vay'hí omén et-hadasa hi estér bat-dodó ki ein lah av va'ém []
      And he brought up Hadassah, that is, Esther, his uncle's daughter: for she had neither father nor mother, []
    • 1994, The Lion King, spoken by Simba (Doron Ben-Ami):
      היי דוד סקאר, כשאהיה מלך, מה אתה תהיה?‎‎
      Hey Dod Skar, kshe'éye mélech, ma atá tíye?
      Hey Uncle Scar, when I'm King, what'll that make you?
  2. (Biblical Hebrew) (A person's) beloved.
    • Song of Songs 2:10, with translation of the King James Version:
      עָנָה דֹודִי וְאָמַר לִי קוּמִי לָךְ רַעְיָתִי יָפָתִי וּלְכִי־לָֽךְ׃‎‎
      My beloved spoke and said to me, “Arise, my darling, my beautiful one, come with me. [continues in next verse]
    • 13th century, anonymous poet, quoted in Yehuda Alharizi, Sefer Tahkemoni:
      לו שר בנו־עמרם פני דודי מתאדמים העת שתות שכר,
      ויפי קצותיו והוד יופיו, לא חק בתורתו: ואת זכר.
      ‎‎
      Had the son of Amram seen the face of my beloved reddened from the foolishness of liquor,
      and the beauty of his extremities and the majesty of his beauty, he would not have written in his Torah: "and with a man [do not lie]".
    • 16th century, Shlomo Halevi Alkabetz, Lekhah Dodi (traditional Jewish prayer for Shabbat):
      לכה דודי לקראת כלה‬
      Come, my beloved, to meet the bride

ReferencesEdit

  • Kogan, Leonid (2011) , “Proto-Semitic Lexicon”, in Weninger, Stefan, editor, The Semitic Languages. An International Handbook (Handbücher zur Sprach- und Kommunikationswissenschaft – Handbooks of Linguistics and Communication Science; 36), Berlin: De Gruyter, →ISBN, page 235

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

דָּוִד (davídm

  1. David, the Biblical son of Jesse and second king of ancient Israel.
  2. A male given name, David.
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lipiński, Edward (2001) Semitic Languages: Outline of a Comparative Grammar (Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta; 80), 2nd edition, Leuven: Peeters, page 110

Etymology 3Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

דּוּד (dudm (plural indefinite דּוּדִים‎, plural construct דּוּדֵי־‎)

  1. (Biblical Hebrew) a cauldron
    • 1 Samuel 2:14, with translation of the King James Version:
      וְהִכָּה בַכִּיֹּור אֹו בַדּוּד אֹו בַקַּלַּחַת אֹו בַפָּרוּר כֹּל אֲשֶׁר יַעֲלֶה הַמַּזְלֵג יִקַּח הַכֹּהֵן בֹּו כָּכָה יַעֲשׂוּ לְכָל־יִשְׂרָאֵל הַבָּאִים שָׁם בְּשִׁלֹֽה׃‎‎
      And he struck it into the pan, or kettle, or caldron, or pot; all that the fleshhook brought up the priest took for himself. So they did in Shiloh unto all the Israelites that came thither.
  2. (by extension, modern) a water heater
Derived termsEdit

YiddishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Hebrew.

Proper nounEdit

דוד (dovedm

  1. David, the Biblical son of Jesse and second king of ancient Israel.
  2. A male given name: David.