successor

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman successour, from Latin successor.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /səkˈsɛsə(ɹ)/, /ˈsʌksɛsə(ɹ)/, /ˈsʌksɛsɔː(ɹ)/, /ˈsʌksɛsɔə/
  • (file)

NounEdit

successor (plural successors)

  1. A person or thing that immediately follows another in holding an office or title.
    George W. Bush was successor to Bill Clinton as President of the US.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      As Di Matteo celebrated and captain John Terry raised the trophy for the fourth time, the Italian increased his claims to become the permanent successor to Andre Villas-Boas by landing a trophy.
  2. The next heir in order or succession.
  3. A person who inherits a title or office.
  4. (arithmetic, set theory) The integer, ordinal number or cardinal number immediately following another.
    A limit ordinal is not the successor of any ordinal.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Other terms used in arithmetic operations:

Advanced hyperoperations: tetration, pentation, hexation


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin successor.

NounEdit

successor m (plural successors, feminine successora)

  1. successor

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From succēdō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

successor m (genitive successōris, feminine succestrīx); third declension

  1. follower, successor

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative successor successōrēs
Genitive successōris successōrum
Dative successōrī successōribus
Accusative successōrem successōrēs
Ablative successōre successōribus
Vocative successor successōrēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • successor”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • successor”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • successor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin successor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

successor m (plural successors)

  1. successor

Related termsEdit