Ctesiphon

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin Ctēsiphōn, from Ancient Greek Κτησιφῶν (Ktēsiphôn).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Ctesiphon

  1. (historical) The ancient capital of Parthia and later of the Sassanid Persian Empire, on the Tigris near Baghdad in present-day Iraq, abandoned in the 7th and 8th centuries.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Κτησιφῶν (Ktēsiphôn). In Old Latin, it was declined as Ctēsiphōn, Ctēsiphōnis.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Ctēsiphōn f sg (genitive Ctēsiphōntis); third declension

  1. Ctesiphon (the ancient capital of Parthia, in modern Iraq)

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun, with locative, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Ctēsiphōn
Genitive Ctēsiphōntis
Dative Ctēsiphōntī
Accusative Ctēsiphōntem
Ablative Ctēsiphōnte
Vocative Ctēsiphōn
Locative Ctēsiphōntī
Ctēsiphōnte

ReferencesEdit

  • Ctesiphon”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Ctesiphon in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette