Emesene

See also: Émésène and émésène

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek Ἐμεσηνός (Emesēnós).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

Emesene (not comparable)

  1. Of or pertaining to Emesa or its region.
    • 2005, Maurice Sartre, The Middle East Under Rome, →ISBN, page 77:
      This association may be explained by the kinship between the Emesene gods and those of Baalbek.
    • 2011, Harry Sidebottom, Lion of the Sun: Warrior of Rome, →ISBN:
      The Emesene guardsman's blade sparked off the marble.
    • 2016, Warwick Ball, Rome in the East: The Transformation of an Empire, →ISBN:
      But the names were presumably popular Emesene ones and may not necessarily refer to the royal family, despite the names' close associations with both the ruling dynasty and the Emesene Sun cult.
    Synonyms: Emesan, Emesenian
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Emesene (plural Emesenes)

  1. (historical) A person from, or an inhabitant of, Emesa or its region.
    • 1854, Theodoret (Bishop of Cyrrhus.) & Evagrius (Scholasticus), A history of the church from A.D. 322 to the death of Theodore of Mopsuestia, A.D. 427:
      And Aurelius Antoninus, the Emesene, was he not slaughtered together with his mother?
    • 1939, John Bagnell Bury, Stanley Arthur Cook, & Frank E. Adcock, The Cambridge Ancient History - Volume 12, page 54:
      But though the fiscus was put in charge of an Emesene of low character, the confiscations which Dio complains of the increased exaction of crown gold", and the general disorder into which the imperial finances fell may have been due less to the rapacity or incompetence of officials than to the foolish liberality by which the Emperor sought to win popular applause.
    • 2002, Anthony R Birley, Septimius Severus: The African Emperor, →ISBN:
      A prominent Emesene, who may well have been a kinsman of Julia, was the victim, one Julius Alexander.
    Synonyms: Emesan, Emesenian
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Ancient Greek Ἐμεσηνή (Emesēnḗ).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Emesene

  1. (historical) A region in Syria along the middle and upper section of the Orontes river, between Epiphaneia to the north and Maurikiopolis to the south.
    • 1990, Seth Schwartz, Josephus and Judaean Politics, →ISBN, page 110:
      Here Remy notes that four kings received ornamenta, the three here mentioned and Sohaemus of Emesene.
    • 2001, Frank R. Trombley, Hellenic Religion and Christianization: C. 370-529, →ISBN, page 150:
      Yet the question remains: how typical of conditions in Mount Lebanon and the Emesene was Abraames' experience?
    • 2007, Barbara Levick, Julia Domna: Syrian Empress, Routledge, page 11:
      All 713 inscriptions from the region of Emesene are in Greek, including funerary monuments.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

GermanEdit

Proper nounEdit

Emesene f (genitive Emesene)

  1. Emesene (ancient region in modern Syria, surrounding Emesa (modern Homs))
    • 2001, Rom und das Reich in der Hohen Kaiserzeit[1], page 421:
      Das Umland war zwar arm [...], doch Palmyra konnte aufgrund seiner außergewöhlichen Lage die gesamte syrische Wüste zwischen der Emesene und dem Euphrat mit seinen Reitern kontrollieren und in diesem Gebiet die Sicherheit der Reisenden gewährleisten.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

 
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Proper nounEdit

Emesene f

  1. Emesene (region)

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

Emesēne

  1. vocative masculine singular of Emesēnus