See also: -der, Der, der-, dér, dêr, dër, and děr

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Imitative.

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: dûr, IPA(key): /dɜː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɜː

Interjection edit

der

  1. (Australia) Disdainful indication that something is obvious.
  2. (Australia) Indication of stupidity.
    • 1979, Gabrielle Carey, Kathy Lette, Puberty Blues, page 46:
      `Sprung!' cried Jeff Basin, the local dubbo. 'Oh, der,' moaned Boardie sarcastically.
Synonyms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Nonstandard spelling of there, reflecting any of a variety of accents with th-stopping.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

der (not comparable)

  1. Nonstandard spelling of there.

Interjection edit

der

  1. Nonstandard spelling of there.

Noun edit

der (uncountable)

  1. Nonstandard spelling of there.

Pronoun edit

der

  1. Nonstandard spelling of there.

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Alemannic German edit

Article edit

der

  1. (definite) the
    • 1856, Jacob Maehly, Rhigmurmel. Gedichte in Basler Mundart, page 187f:
      • 'S Emilie werd im elterlige Roth
        Sich widersetze, wenn [...]
      • In 's Emilies Stammbuech [...]
    • 1872, Caspar Hagen, Dichtungen in alemannischer Mundart aus Vorarlberg, page 67:
      Am Tag der Rast, am Tag der Rueh',
      Schout gern dem Kinderg'wimmel,
      De frohe Kinderspiele zue
      's Allvatterherz vum Himmel!
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1872, Caspar Hagen, Dichtungen in alemannischer Mundart aus Vorarlberg, page 98:
      Was host denn 's Teufels?
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1872, Caspar Hagen, Dichtungen in alemannischer Mundart aus Vorarlberg, page 121:
      Ho 's Johrs vum Kind nü Batze g'hett,
      Und lützel Garba g'schnitte.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1872, Caspar Hagen, Dichtungen in alemannischer Mundart aus Vorarlberg, page 140:
      Der Ehstand ist [...]
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1872, Caspar Hagen, Dichtungen in alemannischer Mundart aus Vorarlberg, page 160:
      Sie nimmt vum Bett de-n-arme Wurm
      Und [...]
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Declension edit

Vorarlberg:

Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative der d' des, 's d'
Genitive 's der 's
Dative dem der dem de
Accusative de
de-n- (before a vowel)
d' des, 's d'

Basel:

Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative der die, d' 's die, d'
Genitive 's
Dative dem der, de dem de
Accusative de die, d' 's d'

Chinese edit

For pronunciation and definitions of der – see .
(This term, der, is an Internet slang variant form of ).

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

der

  1. second-person singular imperative of drát

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse þar, from Proto-Germanic *þar (there), cognate with English there, German da.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɛːˀr/, [ˈd̥ɛˀɐ̯], [ˈd̥eˀɐ̯], (as a pronoun) IPA(key): /dɛr/, [d̥ɑ]

Adverb edit

der

  1. there (in or at that place)

References edit

Pronoun edit

der

  1. (dummy pronoun) there (expletive word put in the subject field when the subject is postponed to the predicate field, typically with indefinite subjects or subjectless passive verbs)
    der sad to katte på et bord
    two cats were sitting on a table (lit. "there sat two cats on a table")
    der blev diskuteret vildt
    people were debating vehemently (lit. "there was debated vehemently")
  2. (relative) who, which, that (introduces relative clauses, only when the pronoun is the subject of the sentence)
    Synonyms: hvilken, som
    alle kan være enige om, at det menneske, der kommer hjem fra sin dannelsesrejse, er et mere fuldbragt menneske end det, der tog af sted.
    everybody can agree that the person that returns from an educational journey is a more complete person than the one that left
  3. added to interrogative pronouns functioning as the subject of interrogative dependent clauses or exclamative independent clauses
    jeg ved godt, hvem der vinder den flaske
    I know who is going to win that bottle
    hvem der bare havde en hund!
    if only I had a dog

References edit

Particle edit

der

  1. (deictic particle) that (put after a definite noun phrase)
    hun købte bordet der for ingen penge
    she bought that table for no money

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (stressed) IPA(key): /dɛr/
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /dər/
  • Hyphenation: der

Etymology 1 edit

Unstressed form of daar (there).

Adverb edit

der

  1. there
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Article edit

der

  1. (dated) (archaic) genitive singular feminine of de; of the.
    geschiedenis der Nederlandsche taalhistory of the Dutch language
  2. (dated) (archaic) genitive plural of de; of the.
    het koninkrijk der Nederlandenthe kingdom of the Netherlands
  3. (dated) (archaic) dative singular feminine of de.
Usage notes edit
  • The distinction of the dative case, which had long been frail and without any basis in actual speech, widely fell out of use over the course of the 19th century. The genitive case, chiefly of the plural, was still productively used in written style in the latter half of the 20th century, especially in order to avoid reduplication of van. However, it has since continuously lost ground and is now reserved to poetic and highly literary language (apart from fixed expressions and surnames).
  • The current pronunciation is a spelling pronunciation. Before the word became archaic, it was pronounced with a schwa, /dər/.
Inflection edit
Dutch definite article
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative de de het de
Genitive des der des der
Dative den der den den
Accusative den de het de


Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of dernier.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

der m or f (plural ders)

  1. last
    la der des ders (referring to the First World War)the war that ends all wars (literally, “the last of the lasts”)

Derived terms edit

Galician edit

Verb edit

der

  1. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of dar

German edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German dër, from Old High German der, ther, replacing the original masculine and feminine nominative forms from Proto-Germanic *sa, by analogy with the adjective inflection. Compare also Old Dutch thie and Old English where the same process occurred.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /de(ː)r/, [deːɐ̯], [dɛɐ̯], [dɐ]
  • The most common pronunciation is [dɛɐ̯], which is possible in all contexts. The form [deːɐ̯] may be used when the word is stressed. The reduced form [dɐ] occurs chiefly after prepositions and conjunctions. In northern and central German vernaculars, the /d/ may in this case assimilate to a preceding coronal (thus in der may colloquially become [ˈɪnɐ]).
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːɐ̯

Article edit

der (definite)

  1. the

Declension edit

German definite articles
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative der die das die
Genitive des der des der
Dative dem der dem den
Accusative den die das die
Old Declension
German definite articles
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative der die das
(older also: daß)
die
Genitive des
(older also: deß)
der des
(older also: deß)
deren or derer, also der
Dative dem der dem denen, also den
Accusative den die das
(older also: daß)
die

This older declension is not used anymore.
For examples see Citations:der.

Derived terms edit

Article edit

der

  1. inflection of der:
    1. genitive/dative feminine singular
    2. genitive plural

Pronoun edit

der m (relative)

  1. who; that; which
    Ich kenne einen Mann, der das kann.I know a man who can do that.

Usage notes edit

In a subordinate clause, indicates a person or thing referenced in the main clause. Used with masculine singular referents.

Declension edit

Declension of der
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative der die das die
genitive dessen deren
younger also: derer
dessen derer
deren
dative dem der dem denen
accusative den die das die
  • By modern grammar works it is said that derer and deren can both be used without difference.
  • Modern grammar books mention the colloquial genitive plural form der.
Old Declension
Declension of der
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative der die das
older also: daß
die
genitive dessen
older also: deß, des
deren
older also: der, dero
dessen
older also: deß, des
derer
also: deren
older also: dero
dative dem
older also: deme
der dem
older also: deme
denen
accusative den die das
older also: daß
die

Pronoun edit

der f (relative)

  1. dative feminine singular of der: (to) whom, which, that

Pronoun edit

der (demonstrative)

  1. (attributive, stressed) that
    Der Mann war es!It was that man!
  2. (indicative) him, he
    Der hat es getan!It was him who did it!
  3. (differential) the one, him
    Der mit dem MantelThe one with the coat

Declension edit

Declension of der
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative der die das die
genitive dessen deren
younger also: derer
dessen derer
deren
dative dem der dem denen
accusative den die das die
  • In modern grammar works, it is said that derer is used cataphorically, while deren is used anaphorically.
  • Modern grammar books mention the colloquial genitive plural form der.
Old Declension
Declension of der
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative der die das
older also: daß
die
genitive dessen
older also: deß, des
deren
older also: der, dero
dessen
older also: deß, des
derer
also: deren
older also: dero
dative dem
older also: deme
der dem
older also: deme
denen
accusative den die das
older also: daß
die

Pronoun edit

der f (demonstrative)

  1. dative feminine singular of der: (to) that, (to) her

Further reading edit

Hunsrik edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

der

  1. unstressed dative of du.

Inflection edit

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

der

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of

Limburgish edit

Alternative forms edit

  • d'r (reduced form, the only form in most dialects)

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch der, unstressed form of dāer, from Old Dutch thar, from Proto-West Germanic *þār, from Proto-Germanic *þar.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

der

  1. there

Synonyms edit

Luxembourgish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle High German der.

In the masculine singular, der was originally nominative and den was accusative. This case distinction, which still exists in Standard German, was then lost in Luxembourgish. Why the form der was reassigned to usage with taboo words seems unexplained.

Determiner edit

der

  1. unstressed form of där
  2. (archaic outside idioms) Alternative form of den (masculine definite article) used with certain taboo words, especially Däiwel (devil) and Doud (death)
Declension edit
Luxembourgish definite articles
masculine feminine neuter plural
nom./acc. deen (den) déi (d') dat (d') déi (d')
dat. deem (dem) där (der) deem (dem) deen (den)
gen. der

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

der

  1. unstressed form of dir
Declension edit

Etymology 3 edit

Fossiled genitive plural of the demonstrative pronoun (see deen). Cognate with German derer (only optionally and rarely so used), Dutch er (used as in Luxembourgish).

Adverb edit

der

  1. Used with numbers that refer back to a previously named noun; compare French en, Dutch er.
    Ech hunn zwee Kanner an hien huet der dräi.
    I have two children and he has three.
    • (Can we date this quote?), “Zwou Bulle Mokka”, performed by Fausti:
      Zwou Bulle Mokka, zwou sou séiss wéi Zocker.
      Zwou Bulle Mokka, do fäls de bal vum Hocker.
      Zwou Bulle Mokka, zwou Bulle man dech frou,
      Well et sinn der zwou – esou.
      Two scoops of mocha, two as sweet as sugar.
      Two scoops of mocha, you almost fall off your stool.
      Two scoops of mocha, two scoops make you happy,
      Because they’re two – just like that.
      Or: Because it’s two of them – just like that.

Middle Dutch edit

Article edit

der

  1. inflection of die:
    1. feminine genitive/dative singular
    2. genitive plural

Adverb edit

der

  1. unstressed form of dāer

Middle High German edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old High German der, from Proto-Germanic *sa, by analogy with the adjective inflection.

Pronoun edit

dër

  1. (definite article) the
    alliu diu freude, die diu werlt hat
    all the joy that the world has
  2. (relative) who, which, that

Declension edit

Declension of dër
Singular
Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative dër diu daz
genitive dës dër(e) dës
dative dëm(e) dër(e) dëm(e)
accusative dën die daz
instrumental diu
Plural
Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative die diu
genitive dër(e)
dative dën
accusative die diu

Descendants edit

  • Alemannic German: der
  • German: der
  • Pennsylvania German: der
  • Yiddish: ⁧דער(der)

Mòcheno edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German der, from Old High German der, ther, from Proto-Germanic *þa, an alteration of *sa. Cognate with German der, English the.

Article edit

der (feminine de, neuter s, plural de)

  1. the, nominative singular masculine definite article

References edit

Northern Kurdish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer-. Compare English door, Persianدر(dar), Ossetian дуар (dwar), Avestan𐬛𐬎𐬎𐬀𐬭𐬆𐬨(duuarəm), Russian дверь (dverʹ).

Adverb edit

der

  1. out, outside, outdoors

Noun edit

der f

  1. door

Synonyms edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse þar.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

der

  1. there

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse þar. Akin to English there.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

der

  1. there
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle Norwegian *þiðr, whence also dere. Borrowed from Old East Norse iðʀ with added þ-, similar to þit from hafið it.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

der

  1. (dialectal, South East Norway) objective case of de; alternative form of dykk (you (plural))

References edit

Old High German edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Derived from Proto-Germanic *sa, by analogy with the adjective inflection.

Pronoun edit

der

  1. (definite article) the
  2. (relative) who, which, that

Declension edit

Declension of der
Singular
Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative der diu daz
genitive des dera (deru, dero) des
dative demu, demo deru, dero demu, demo
accusative den dea, dia (die) daz
instrumental diu diu
Plural
Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative de, dea, dia, die deo, dio diu (dei)
genitive dero
dative dem, den
accusative de, dea, dia, die deo, dio diu (dei)

Descendants edit

  • Middle High German: dër
    • Alemannic German: der
    • German: der
    • Pennsylvania German: der
    • Yiddish: ⁧דער(der)

Pennsylvania German edit

Etymology edit

Compare German der.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

der m (definite)

  1. the

Declension edit

Pennsylvania German definite articles
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative der die es die
Dative dem or em der dem or em de
Accusative der or den die es die

Article edit

der

  1. inflection of der:
    1. dative feminine singular
    2. accusative masculine singular

Pronoun edit

der

  1. dative of du: you, to you

Declension edit

Pronoun edit

der

  1. you (plural)
  2. you (polite)

Declension edit

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

 
 

Verb edit

der

  1. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of dar

Swedish edit

Adverb edit

der

  1. Obsolete spelling of där

Anagrams edit

Turkish edit

Verb edit

der

  1. third-person singular indicative aorist of demek

West Frisian edit

Adverb edit

der

  1. there (unspecific to distance)
    Der binne trije Fryske talen
    There are three Frisian languages.

Further reading edit

  • der (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Wolof edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

der (definite form der wi)

  1. skin