See also: emesa

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ἔμεσα (Émesa). Doublet of Homs.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Emesa

  1. (historical) The ancient city of Homs.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Emesa” in the Collins English Dictionary
  2. ^ Emesa”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  3. ^ Emesa”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary, (Please provide a date or year).
  • Worcester, Joseph E. (1861) An Elementary Dictionary of the English Language[1], Boston: Swan, Brewer & Tileston, page 334

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ἔμεσα (Émesa).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Emesa

  1. Emesa

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ἔμεσα (Émesa).

Proper nounEdit

Emesa n (genitive Emesas)

  1. Emesa (ancient city in modern Syria; modern Homs)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ἔμεσα (Émesa).

Proper nounEdit

Emesa f

  1. Emesa

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Ἔμεσα (Émesa).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Emesa f sg (genitive Emesae); first declension

  1. Emesa

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun, with locative, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Emesa
Genitive Emesae
Dative Emesae
Accusative Emesam
Ablative Emesā
Vocative Emesa
Locative Emesae

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Emesa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Emesa in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Emesa, from Ancient Greek Ἔμεσα (Émesa).

Proper nounEdit

Emesa f

  1. (historical) Emesa

Related termsEdit