English edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Ancient Greek Ἑλλάς (Hellás, Greece).

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Hellas

  1. Greece; (specifically) Ancient Greece.
    • 1999 March, Sean McMeekin, “The Place that Launched a Thousand Ships”, in Literary Review:
      Modern Greece would not be Byzantium reborn. Rather, it was an imagined nation conjured up from ancient Hellas.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Czech edit

Proper noun edit

Hellas f (related adjective helladský)

  1. Hellas (Greece, especially Ancient Greece)
    Synonym: Helada

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Hellas in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • Hellas in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Latin edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Ἑλλάς (Hellás)

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Hellas f sg (genitive Helladis); third declension

  1. (poetic) Synonym of Graecia (Greece)
  2. a female given name from Ancient Greek
    • 65 BCE – 8 BCE, Horace, Satires 2.3.276:
      Modo, inquam, Hellade percussa Marius cum praecipitat se cerritus fuit?
      The other day, for instance, when Marius killed Hellas and then flung himself headlong, was he crazy?

Declension edit

Third-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Hellas
Genitive Helladis
Dative Helladī
Accusative Helladem
Ablative Hellade
Vocative Hellas

Descendants edit

All borrowings:

  • French: Hellade
  • Portuguese: Hélade
  • Spanish: Hélade

References edit

  • Hellas”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Hellas in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette, page 739
  • Hellas in Georges, Karl Ernst; Georges, Heinrich (1913–1918) Ausführliches lateinisch-deutsches Handwörterbuch, volume 1, 8th edition, Hahnsche Buchhandlung
  • Hellas”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

Directly borrowed from Greek Ελλάς (Ellás, Greece), possibly being influenced by Ancient Greek Ἑλλάς (Hellás, Greece), in 1932 to replace the Danish loanword and German cognate Grekenland as part of a trend to adopt endonyms as Norway was nation-building during the early 20th century and as a compromise during the early stages of the Norwegian language conflict, with Nynorsk and Samnorsk advocates rejecting the existing name and Grekerland, a calque of Swedish Grekland, only working in Bokmål (where Greek is greker, being grekar instead in Nynorsk). In the 1970s, the Norwegian Foreign Ministry attempted to reverse the name change to be more similar to other European countries. Although this movement gained enough momentum to make it to the Language Council of Norway, it was rejected by a majority of the Council.[1]

Proper noun edit

Hellas n

  1. Greece (a country in Southeast Europe)

Related terms edit

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ “Lesarspørsmål”, in Språknytt[1], Oslo: Language Council of Norway (Språkrådet), January 2016, →ISSN, pages 3-4 (PDF)

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology edit

See #Etymology_2.

Proper noun edit

Hellas n

  1. Greece (a country in Southeast Europe)

Related terms edit