Londinium

EnglishEdit

 
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Proper nounEdit

Londinium

  1. an ancient settlement in the area of modern London

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain, but likely from Proto-Celtic *Londinjon (place that floods), from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (to sink; subdue) + *-injo-, a suffix forming specific nouns and found in other Romano-Celtic placenames. Cognate to Proto-Celtic *landā (low-lying land), whence Old Irish land, Welsh llan, as well as *londos (subduing > fierce, adj.), whence Old Irish lond.[1]

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /lonˈdi.ni.um/, [ɫ̪ɔn̪ˈd̪ɪniʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /lonˈdi.ni.um/, [lɔn̪ˈd̪iːnium]
  • Note: the length of the medial /i/ is unattested, but is likely to have been short.

Proper nounEdit

Londinium n sg (genitive Londiniī or Londinī); second declension

  1. London

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter), with locative, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Londinium
Genitive Londiniī
Londinī1
Dative Londiniō
Accusative Londinium
Ablative Londiniō
Vocative Londinium
Locative Londiniī

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Peter Schrijver (2013) Language Contact and the Origins of the Germanic Languages[1], Routledge, →ISBN, pages 54-57
  2. ^ Richard Coates (1998), “A New Explanation of the Name of London”, in Transactions of the Philological Society[2], volume 96, issue 2, DOI:10.1111/1467-968X.00027, ISSN 1467-968X, page 203–229

Further readingEdit

  • Londinium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Londinium in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette