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FaroeseEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English land, from Proto-Germanic *landą.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lɔːnd/, /land/, /lɔnd/, /laːnd/

NounEdit

lond (plural londes)

  1. An independent nation, country or realm.
  2. A tribe, folk or race; a ethnicity
  3. A land; territory or locality
    • a. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “Book II”, in Troilus and Criseyde, line 22-28:
      Ȝe knowe ek that in fourme of ſpeche is chaunge / With-inne a thousand ȝeer, and wordes tho /That hadden pris now wonder nyce and ſtraunge /Us thenketh hem, and ȝet thei ſpake hem so / And ſpedde as wel in loue as men now do / Ek forto wynnen loue in ſondry ages / In ſondry londes, ſondry ben vſages []
      You also know that the form of language is in flux; / within a thousand years, words / that had currency; really weird and bizarre / they seem to us now, but they still spoke them / and accomplished as much in love as men do now. / As for winning love across ages and / across nations, there are lots of usages []
  4. A subdivision or province of a nation.
  5. A property; a plot of land.
  6. Agricultural land; land that is suitable for growing crops.
  7. Planet Earth; the world.
  8. The earth, ground, or soil (also as one of the medieval elements)
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From londe (noun).

VerbEdit

lond

  1. Alternative form of londen