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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Micawber +‎ -ly: from the Dickens character Wilkins Micawber, noted for his naive optimism, always confident that "something will turn up".

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɪˈkɔːbə(ɹ)li/

AdverbEdit

Micawberly (comparative more Micawberly, superlative most Micawberly)

  1. In an optimistic manner, naively expecting something to turn up
    • 1872, Adeline Dutton Train Whitney, Sights and Insights: Patience Strong's Story of Over the Way Volume 1 (J.R. Osgood & Company, 1876) p. 151
      ... not growing a single spiritual inch, for putting forth his powers as a man should; just amiably Micawbering along, and most Micawberly devoted to somebody he would like well enough to marry when the times comes and things "turn up;" ....
    • 1875, "Grand Duke Alexis", Galveston Daily News (Jan 31, 1875) Page 1, column 2 (bottom)
      The marriage of Grand Duke Alexis in his proper station in life is indefinitely postponed, and Count Shouvalod and his imperial master must wait, Micawberly, for something to turn up.
    • 1995, William A. Senior, Stephen R. Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant: Variations on the Fantasy Tradition (Kent State University Press, 1995) p. 176
      Covenant doggedly searches for a way out of his predicament and vows to keep moving in the hopes that, macabrely (as opposed to Micawberly) put, something will turn up.