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See also: norma, normá, and normā

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Coined name of an imaginary Celtic priestess in Bellini's opera Norma (1831). Sometimes explained as Latin norma (pattern, model), or as a feminine form of Norman

Proper nounEdit

Norma

  1. A female given name.
    • 1966 Agatha Christie, Third Girl, page 6:
      I wish I could remember that girl's Christian name. Something connected with a song...Thora? Speak to me, Thora, Thora, Thora. Something like that, or Myra? Myra, oh Myra my love is all for thee... Norma? Or do I mean Maritana? Norma - Norma Restarick. That's right, I'm sure.
Usage notesEdit
  • Popular in the U.S.A. in the 1930s.

Etymology 2Edit

 
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Named by the French astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in 1763. From Latin norma (a carpenter's square).

Proper nounEdit

Norma

  1. (astronomy) An inconspicuous constellation of the southern sky, said to resemble a carpenter's square. It lies south of the constellations Scorpius and Centaurus.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English Norma, after the imaginary Celtic priestess in Bellini's opera Norma.

Proper nounEdit

Norma

  1. a female given name

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:Norma.


FaroeseEdit

Proper nounEdit

Norma f

  1. A female given name

Usage notesEdit

Matronymics

  • son of Norma: Normuson
  • daughter of Norma: Normudóttir

DeclensionEdit

Singular
Indefinite
Nominative Norma
Accusative Normu
Dative Normu
Genitive Normu

TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English Norma.

Proper nounEdit

Norma

  1. A female given name