Palmyrene

See also: Palmyrène and palmyrène

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek Παλμυρηνός (Palmurēnós).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

Palmyrene (not comparable)

  1. Of, from or relating to ancient Palmyra or Palmyrena.
    • 1982, Han J. W. Drijvers, Sanctuaries and Social Safety: The Iconography of Divine Peace in Hellenistic Syria, in Visible Religion: Annual for Religious Iconography, Volume 1: Commemorative Figures, E. J. Brill, page 65,
      The contrast between the deterrent lion with open mouth and luxurious mane and the peaceful antelope is striking, so more since the antelope is represented in profile while the lion, on the contrary, fully obeys the artistic law of frontality which is one of the most characteristic features of Palmyrene art.2 Only early examples of Palmyrene sculpture from the first century B.C. and the beginning of the first century A.D. still show representations of human beings in profile.
    • 1986, Malcolm A. R. Colledge, The Parthian Period, Iconography of Religions, Section XIV: Iran, Fascicle 3, E. J. Brill, page 26,
      From Rome came the legend of the twins Romulus and Remus being suckled by a she-wolf, illustrated on a battered relief found in the Palmyrene temple of Bel;
    • 2002, Tal Ilan, Lexicon of Jewish Names in Late Antiquity, Part IV: The Eastern Diaspora 330 BCE-650 CE, Mohr Siebeck, page 33,
      This cave housed an extended Palmyrene family, as indicated by the script used in some of the inscriptions and by some of the names of the interned.
  2. Relating to the Palmyrene dialect or script
    • 1757, John Swinton, Diſſertation upon a Parthian coin, with Characters on the Reverſe reſembling thoſe of the Palmyrenes, in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Volume 29, page 593,
      The reverse presents to our view a ſtrange fort of inſtrument, or machine, which perhaps may be imagined to repreſent a key, beſides ſome traces of characters in a great measure defaced, and, if I am not vaſtly miſtaken, four intire Palmyrene letters.
    • 2003, James Noel Adams, Bilingualism and the Latin Language, Cambridge University Press, page 270,
      The names of the deities retain their Palmyrene form in both the Palmyrene and Greek versions.
    • 2009, Sebastian Brock, Chapter 11: Edessene Syriac inscriptions in late antique Syria, Hannah M. Cotton, Robert G. Hoyland, Jonathan J. Price, David J. Wasserstein (editors), From Hellenism to Islam: Cultural and Linguistic Change in the Roman Near East, Cambridge University Press, page 289,
      An isolated ostracon has turned up in Germany,2 but otherwise there is nothing comparable to the geographic spread of the Nabataean and, above all, the Palmyrene inscriptions, the latter spanning from South Shields (in northern England) to Soqotra.
    Synonyms: Palmyran, Palmyrenian
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Palmyrene (plural Palmyrenes)

  1. (historical) A native or inhabitant of ancient Palmyra or Palmyrena.
    • 1995, Richard Stoneman, Palmyra and Its Empire: Zenobia's Revolt Against Rome, University of Michigan Press, page 31,
      The importance of the Palmyrenes was as merchants, and it is as merchants that they become known to us in our earliest Roman reference.
    • 2000, Warwick Ball, Rome in the East: The Transformation of an Empire, Taylor & Francis (Routledge), page 80,
      For in the course of the campaign the Roman provincial capital of Bostra fell to the Palmyrenes – whether by accident or design - along with a Roman force.
    • 2008, Pat Southern, Empress Zenobia: Palmyra's Rebel Queen, Continuum Books, page 131,
      There is no surviving contemporary account of the war between the Palmyrenes and the Emperor Aurelian.
    Synonyms: Palmyran, Palmyrenian
TranslationsEdit

Proper nounEdit

Palmyrene

  1. An extinct Western Aramaic dialect.
    • 1989, Jean-Marie Dentzer, Winfried Orthmann, Archéologie et histoire de la Syrie[1], page 74:
      The first panel is a bilingual text in Greek and Palmyrene, the second entirely in Palmyrene, and the third and fourth entirely in Greek.
    • 2003, Gary K. Young, Rome's Eastern Trade[2], page 209:
      In one such inscription, Odaenathus is referred to in Palmyrene simply as Ras Tadmor without any indicators of Roman rank.
    • 2017, Kyle H. Keimer, Gillan Davis, Registers and Modes of Communication in the Ancient Near East[3]:
      The auxiliaries also occasionally left behind bilingual dedications in Palmyrene with Greek or Latin.
    Synonyms: Palmyran, Palmyrenian
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Ancient Greek Παλμυρηνή (Palmurēnḗ).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Palmyrene

  1. Alternative form of Palmyrena
    • 1646, A vindication of learning from unjust aspersions[4], volume 1:
      ..., scituated between Palmyrene and Cœlosiria, in that Country or Province known to the Romans, ...
    • 1754, John Swinton, An Explication of All the Inscriptions in the Palmyrene Language[5], page 344:
      ... the capital of Acabene, a province or district of Mesopotamia, a region separated from Palmyrene by the Euphrates.
    • 1936, The Cambridge Ancient History[6], volume 11, page 860:
      This is proved by two inscriptions from Palmyrene, ...

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.lexico.com/definition/palmyrene
  2. ^ Palmyrene”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Παλμυρηνή (Palmurēnḗ).

Proper nounEdit

Palmyrene f (genitive Palmyrene)

  1. Palmyrena (ancient country)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

Proper nounEdit

Palmȳrēnē f sg (genitive Palmȳrēnēs); first declension

  1. Alternative form of Palmȳrēna
    • 1729, Chronicon Orientale Petri Rahebi Ægyptii[7], page 164:
      Sæpe tamen in Syriam, in Judæam, in Mesopotamiam, in Palmyrenen excurrerunt Nabatæi, Idumæi, uno verbo Arabes Petrææ atque Desertæ.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun (Greek-type), with locative, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Palmȳrēnē
Genitive Palmȳrēnēs
Dative Palmȳrēnae
Accusative Palmȳrēnēn
Ablative Palmȳrēnē
Vocative Palmȳrēnē
Locative Palmȳrēnae

AdjectiveEdit

Palmȳrēne

  1. vocative masculine singular of Palmȳrēnus