Rosamund

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of Germanic origin (probably Frankish via French Rosemonde or Lombardic via Italian Rosmunda), from Proto-Germanic *hrussą (horse) and *mundō (protection). By medieval folk etymology interpreted as Latin rosa munda (pure rose) or rosa mundī (rose of the world) in reference to the Virgin Mary.[1]

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /ˈrɒzəmənd/, IPA(key): /ˈroʊzəmənd/

Proper nounEdit

Rosamund

  1. A female given name from the Germanic languages.
    • 1977 Agatha Christie, An Autobiography, HarperCollins (2011), →ISBN, page 31:
      Cooks of any seniority were always 'Mrs'. Housemaids and parlourmaids were supposed to have 'suitable' names - e.g. Jane, Mary, Edith, etc. Such names as Violet, Muriel, Rosamund and so on were not considered suitable, and the girl was told firmly, 'Whilst you are in my service you will be called "Mary"'.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges: A Concise Dictionary of First Names. Oxford University Press 1990, p. 287.