Tea room discussionEdit

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In citing the "get the F off" sense for RFV, I'm finding that some cites seem to mean "get the F out of" — as in, they seem to mean "get the F out", but given the lack of "of", their syntax seems to match "get the F off". (Examples include "GTFO the kitchen", "GTFO the profession", and "GTFO the way".) Looking further, I find that google:"get out the kitchen", google:"get out the way", and even google:"get out the profession" all get hits. I'm not sure what to make of this; we do define out as a preposition meaning "Away from the inside", but our example sentence ("He threw it out the door") is not the same.

I guess what I'm wondering is:

  • are "out the kitchen", "out the way", etc. a regular feature of some form of English?
  • if so, is "GTFO the kitchen" short for "get the F out the kitchen", or for "get the F out of the kitchen"?
  • in ambiguous "of"-less cases, such as "GTFO our [Usenet] group", do you prefer an "out/out of" reading, or an "off" reading?

(I'm ignoring the fact that "off" can appear with or without "of" — "fell off (of) his chair" — because it doesn't seem relevant to me, but maybe it is?)

What do y'all think?

RuakhTALK 19:21, 16 February 2009 (UTC)

In my personal experience out is used as shorthand slang for out of when it precedes the definite article (or a personal pronoun as you note). That seems to be what is happening here. It seems to be more common in British English and African-American dialects of US English than in other places. --EncycloPetey 19:26, 16 February 2009 (UTC)

GTFO, it's definitely just "get the f*** out," and I'm pretty sure it means "let's change the subject" or "I'm sure that you are lying." -VitaminN

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Sense 3: "get the fuck on" or "get the fuck off". Equinox 22:05, 6 February 2009 (UTC)

Some uses and mentions of "off" form on google Groups. DCDuring TALK 23:00, 6 February 2009 (UTC)
More uses at google groups:"GTFO my". —RuakhTALK 01:54, 10 February 2009 (UTC)
Cited, so striking. Equinox 13:56, 17 May 2009 (UTC)

Return to "GTFO" page.