See also: trappe and trappé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly named in reference to wolf traps, or possibly after a Trappist monastery.

Proper nounEdit

Trappe

  1. A town in Maryland.
  2. A borough of Pennsylvania.

ReferencesEdit

  • Wood, J. A. (2016). Beyond the Ballpark: The Honorable, Immoral, and Eccentric Lives of Baseball Legends. United States: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, p. 67

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German trappe, possibly a borrowing from Slavic, from Proto-Slavic *dropъty, whose first part is probably from Proto-Indo-European *dreh₂- (run) and the other from Proto-Slavic *pъta (bird), which is probably based on Proto-Indo-European *put- (a young, a child, a little animal).[1][2]

See also Russian дрофа (drofa), Czech drop, Polish drop, Romanian dropie.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -apə

NounEdit

Trappe f (genitive Trappe, plural Trappen)

  1. (birds) bustard

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "drop" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, Leda, 2015, →ISBN, page 157–158.
  2. ^ "pták" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, Leda, 2015, →ISBN, page 569.