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Alemannic GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German vatter, vater, from Old High German fater, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr. Cognate with German Vater, Dutch vader, Plautdietsch Voda, West Frisian faar, English father, Icelandic faðir, Swedish far.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Zurich) IPA(key): /ˈfɑtːər/

NounEdit

Vatter m (genitive Vatters, plural Vättere)

  1. father
    • 1903, Robert Walser, Der Teich:
      So, das säge n'i am Vatter.
      I'll tell father.

Central FranconianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From early modern German Vatter (contemporary Vater). The native dialectal form is obsolete Vader. Both from Old High German fater, fader.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Vatter m (plural Vätter, diminutive Vätterche)

  1. father
    Menge Bapp hät jemeent, als Vatter moss mer seng Famillich alleen ernähre.
    My father thought that as a father you must provide for your family on your own.

Usage notesEdit

  • The commoner word for “male parent” is Bapp, Papp, but Vatter is common in other senses, e.g. “father” as a position within the family. (Compare the example above.)
  • Only Vatter is used for the Christian God.

See alsoEdit