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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

fade +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fader (plural faders)

  1. A device used to control sound volume.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fader

  1. comparative form of fade: more fade

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

NounEdit

fader c (singular definite faderen, plural indefinite fædre)

  1. (now formal) father
  2. A term of address for a Christian priest.

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Occitan fadar.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

fader

  1. (reflexive, informal) to get stuck with

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fader

  1. comparative degree of fade

LuxembourgishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fader

  1. feminine dative of fad

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English fæder, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfadər/, /ˈfaːdər/, /ˈfaðər/, /ˈfɛdər/, /ˈfɛːdər/

NounEdit

fader (plural faders or fadres, genitive fader or faders or fadres)

  1. A father; the male direct ancestor of someone or some creature.
  2. The indirect male ancestor of someone or some creature.
  3. The inventor or starter of an idea, nation or lineage.
  4. A spiritual superordinate, teacher, or leader:
    1. An individual who one offers confessions to; a confessor.
    2. One of the Church Fathers; an author of patristic writings.
  5. God/Jesus as father (as of Jesus, as in the Trinity, as inventor, or as leader).
  6. A polite appellation signifiying inferiority on behalf of the speaker.
  7. (rare) A secular superordinate, ruler, or leader.
  8. (rare) A Roman senator; a member of the Roman senate.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: father
  • Scots: faither, fader, faether, faider, fither
  • Yola: vather

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

NounEdit

fader m (definite singular faderen, indefinite plural fedre, definite plural fedrene)

  1. father (often in a religious context)

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fader m (definite singular faderen, indefinite plural fedrar, definite plural fedrane)

  1. (archaic, poetic) father

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


ScotsEdit

NounEdit

fader (plural faders)

  1. Alternative form of faither

SwedishEdit