See also: Far, far-, fár, får, and fær

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English ferre, fer, Old English feor, feorr, from Proto-Germanic *ferrai.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

far (comparative farther or further, superlative farthest or furthest or farthermost or furthermost)

  1. Distant; remote in space.
    He went to a far land.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], →OCLC, Joshua 9:6:
      And they went to Ioshua vnto the campe at Gilgal, and said vnto him, and to the men of Israel, Wee be come from a farre countrey: Now therefore make ye a league with vs.
    • 2009, Graham Huggan, Ian Law, Racism Postcolonialism Europe, page 1:
      Tsiolkas's Europe, as voraciously predatory as his own undead protagonist, is a far cry from the fount of idealistic humanism dreamed up by generations of both pre- and post-Enlightenment politicians and philosophers, a Europe defined by its durable capacity for civility in an otherwise barbarous world.
  2. Remote in time.
    the far future
  3. Long. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
    • 2011, Peggy Woods, Ramblings from a Soul, page 42:
      I have such a long way to go but yet I have come such a far piece already
  4. More remote of two.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter XIX, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, →OCLC:
      At the far end of the houses the head gardener stood waiting for his mistress, and he gave her strips of bass to tie up her nosegay. This she did slowly and laboriously, with knuckly old fingers that shook.
    See those two mountains? The ogre lives on the far one.
    He moved to the far end of the state. She remained at this end.
  5. Extreme, as measured from some central or neutral position.
    They are on the far right on this issue.
    • 2010, William Alexander Patterson, 4th, The City Is served Bartholomew! to the American Prison!, page 118:
      He was withdrawn to such a far degree that it required of Piers and Jude a good deal of occasional conferencing between the two of them, in private.
  6. Extreme, as a difference in nature or quality.
    • 1657, Henry Ainsworth, Zachary Coke, The Art of Logick., page 26:
      As sensible maketh a man differ from a stone, in a far difference; for other Species, as Beasts, have the same difference, but reasonable is the nearest, whereby he differeth from a stone, beasts, and all other things.
    • 1979, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Armed Services, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Foreign Relations, Military situation in the Far East - Volume 3, page 1737:
      Is there not a far difference between asking it up and urging it, Mr. Secretary ?
    • 2010, Deborah Cartmell, Screen Adaptations: Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, page 78:
      The pressbook identifies the film as a 'picturization of Jane Austen's widely read novel' and starring Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier (based on the theatrical adaptation by Helen Jerome), it is a far remove from adaptations that follow.
    • 2014, Henry Sussman, Playful Intelligence: Digitizing Tradition, page 124:
      This may not be at such a far remove from the endlessly recursive textual inventions of Kafka, Beckett, and Bernhard as it may seem.
  7. (programming, not comparable) Outside the currently selected segment in a segmented memory architecture.
    far heap; far memory; far pointer
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Adverb edit

far (comparative farther or further, superlative farthest or furthest)

  1. To, from or over a great distance in space, time or other extent.
    You have all come far and you will go farther.
    He built a time machine and travelled far into the future.
    Over time, his views moved far away from mine.
  2. Very much; by a great amount.
    He was far richer than we'd thought.
    The expense far exceeds what I expected.
    I saw a tiny figure far below me.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport:
      The Reds were on the back foot early on when a catalogue of defensive errors led to Ramires giving Chelsea the lead. Jay Spearing conceded possession in midfield and Ramires escaped Jose Enrique far too easily before scoring at the near post with a shot Reina should have saved.
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

far (third-person singular simple present fars, present participle farring, simple past and past participle farred)

  1. (transitive, rare) To send far away.
    • 1864, Elizabeth Gaskell, Cousin Phillis:
      But I wish he'd been farred before he ever came near this house, with his “Please Betty” this, and “Please Betty” that, and drinking up our new milk as if he'd been a cat. I hate such beguiling ways.
    • 1962, Thomas Berger, Reinhart in Love:
      […] so Joe come to me and he uz sore as a boil and said you goddam prevert, I don't want no twenny-two-year-old mechanic who still pulls his pood in the toilet, and farred me.

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin far. Doublet of farro.

Noun edit

far (uncountable)

  1. Spelt (a type of wheat, Triticum spelta), especially in the context of Roman use of it.
    • 1756, Aurelius Cornelius Celsus, Medicine: In Eight Books, page 108:
      A cataplasm made from any meal is heating, whether it be of wheat, or of far, or barley, or bitter vetch, ...
    • 1857, John Marius Wilson, The Rural Cyclopedia:
      Almost all the rustic writers agree in this, that far is most proper for wet clay land, and triticum for dry land. 'In wet red clays,' says Cato, 'sow far; and in dry, clean, and open lands, sow triticum.'
    • 1872, John Cordy Jeaffreson, Brides and Bridals, volume 1, page 201:
      Our wedding-cake is the memorial of a practice, that bore a striking resemblance to, if it was not derived from, confarreatio, the form of marriage that had fallen into general disuse amongst the Romans in the time of Tiberius. Taking its name from the cake of far and mola salsa that was broken over the bride's head, confarreatio was attended with an incident that increases its resemblance to the way in which our ancestors used at their weddings objects symbolical of natural plentifulness.
    • 1919, Carl Holliday, Wedding Customs Then and Now, page 32:
      The early Romans broke a cake of far and mola salsa (salted meal) over the bride's head, — a symbol of plentifulness, []
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

far (plural fars)

  1. (UK, dialect) A litter of piglets; a farrow.

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin Pharus.

Noun edit

far m

  1. lighthouse

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pharus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

far m (plural fars)

  1. lighthouse
  2. headlight

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Cimbrian edit

Noun edit

far ?

  1. fern

References edit

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dalmatian edit

Verb edit

far

  1. Alternative form of facro

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

far c (singular definite faren, plural indefinite fædre)

  1. father, dad

Inflection edit

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

Back-formation from fari (to do, to make).

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

far

  1. (neologism) by[1]
    La libro de Johano far Ŝekspiro
    John's book by Shakespeare
    regado de la popolo, far la popolo, kaj por la popolo
    government of the people, by the people, and for the people
    Synonyms: de, fare de

Usage notes edit

Unofficial. The most common innovative preposition, far is used for some of the functions of the preposition de "of, from, by", which some authors feel is overworked. Useful to distinguish, for example, the owner of a book (de) from the author (far).

References edit

  1. ^ Wennergren, Bertilo (2010-03-09), “Neoficialaj rolvortetoj”, in Plena Manlibro de Esperanta Gramatiko[1] (in Esperanto), archived from the original on 2010-09-27

Faroese edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse far.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

far n (genitive singular fars, plural før)

  1. drive, ride, tour
  2. vessel
  3. trace, sign

Declension edit

Declension of far
n5 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative far farið før førini
accusative far farið før førini
dative fari farinum førum førunum
genitive fars farsins fara faranna

Derived terms edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

 
far breton aux pruneaux (far breton with prunes)

Noun edit

far m (plural fars)

  1. a traditional Breton cake
    Synonym: far breton

Further reading edit

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Uralic *ponče (tail).[1] Older hypotheses have attempted to derive far from Proto-Uralic *pure- (back, rear) or Proto-Finno-Ugric *perä (back, rear).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

far (plural farok)

  1. buttock, posterior
    Synonyms: fenék, ülep, hátsó, segg
  2. stern (ship)
  3. tail, rear (vehicle)

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative far farok
accusative fart farokat
dative farnak faroknak
instrumental farral farokkal
causal-final farért farokért
translative farrá farokká
terminative farig farokig
essive-formal farként farokként
essive-modal
inessive farban farokban
superessive faron farokon
adessive farnál faroknál
illative farba farokba
sublative farra farokra
allative farhoz farokhoz
elative farból farokból
delative farról farokról
ablative fartól faroktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
faré faroké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
faréi farokéi
Possessive forms of far
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. farom faraim
2nd person sing. farod faraid
3rd person sing. fara farai
1st person plural farunk faraink
2nd person plural farotok faraitok
3rd person plural faruk faraik

Derived terms edit

Compound words

References edit

  1. ^ Aikio, Ante (= Luobbal Sámmol Sámmol Ánte). “Notes on the development of some consonant clusters in Hungarian”. In: Sampsa Holopainen & Janne Saarikivi (eds.), Περὶ ὀρθότητος ἐτύμων. Uusiutuva uralilainen etymologia, Uralica Helsingiensia 11, 2018, pp. 77–90.

Further reading edit

  • far in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse fǫr (journey).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

far n (genitive singular fars, nominative plural för)

  1. passage, ride
    Má ég fá far?
    Can I get a ride?
  2. imprint, trace
  3. character, personality

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Italian edit

Verb edit

far (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of fare

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *fars (flour, grain),[1] possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰers- (spike, prickle) (compare Welsh bara (bread), English barley, Serbo-Croatian brȁšno (flour), Albanian bar (grass), Ancient Greek Φηρῶν (Phērôn, plant deity)).

Pronunciation edit

The nominative-accusative singular form scans as a long syllable in Ovid (cited below). Therefore, some sources mark the vowel in this form as long (fār), but an alternative explanation is that despite being spelled with a single letter r, this word form was pronounced with the underlying geminate /rr/ of the stem when the following word started with a vowel.[2]

Noun edit

far n (genitive farris); third declension

  1. farro, a type of hulled wheat. (Most likely emmer (Triticum dicoccum or Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccon) but often mistranslated as spelt (Triticum spelta)) [3] [4]
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.338:
      Ante, deos homini quod conciliare valeret, / far erat et puri lucida mica salis.
      Of old, the means to win the goodwill of the gods were far and sparkling grains of pure salt.
      ― Fay Glinister, “Festus and Ritual Foodstuffs” p. 220
  2. coarse meal; grits

Declension edit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative far farra
Genitive farris farrum
Dative farrī farribus
Accusative far farra
Ablative farre farribus
Vocative far farra

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Franco-Provençal: far
  • Galician: farelo
  • Italian: farro
  • Portuguese: farelo
  • Sicilian: farru
  • English: far

References edit

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 201-2
  2. ^ Charles Edwin Bennett (1907) The Latin Language: A Historical Outline of Its Sounds, Inflections, and Syntax, page 118
  3. ^ Thompson, D'Arcy W. “Wheat in Antiquity.” The Classical Review, vol. 60, no. 3, 1946, pp. 120–122. JSTOR. Accessed 6 June 2021.
  4. ^ Glinister, Fay “Festus and Ritual Foodstuffs.” Eruditio Antiqua 6 (2014), pp. 215-227.

Maltese edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Arabicفَأْر(faʔr, mouse).

Noun edit

far m (plural firien or fariet, feminine fara)

  1. rat
    Synonym: ġurdien
  2. Y-shaped frame of a slingshot
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Root
f-w-r
5 terms

From Arabicفارَ(fāra).

Verb edit

far (imperfect jfur, verbal noun fawran)

  1. to overflow
Conjugation edit
    Conjugation of far
singular plural
1st person 2nd person 3rd person 1st person 2nd person 3rd person
perfect m fort fort far forna fortu faru
f faret
imperfect m nfur tfur jfur nfuru tfuru jfuru
f tfur
imperative fur furu

Middle English edit

Noun edit

far

  1. Alternative form of fare

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father). Compare longer version fader.

Noun edit

far m (definite singular faren, indefinite plural fedre, definite plural fedrene)

  1. a father
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

far

  1. imperative of fare

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father). Compare longer version fader.

Noun edit

far m (definite singular faren, indefinite plural fedrar, definite plural fedrane)

  1. father
Inflection edit
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse far, from Proto-Germanic *farą.

Noun edit

far n (definite singular faret, indefinite plural far, definite plural fara)

  1. trace, track
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

far

  1. imperative of fara

References edit

Occitan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

far m (plural fars)

  1. (nautical) lighthouse

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

far

  1. Alternative form of faire

Old Irish edit

Determiner edit

far

  1. Alternative form of for

Old Norse edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Germanic *farą.

Noun edit

far n (genitive fars, plural fǫr)

  1. a means of passage
  2. passage
  3. trace, print, track
  4. life, conduct, behaviour
  5. state, condition
Declension edit
Descendants edit
  • Icelandic: far
  • Faroese: far
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: far
  • Norwegian Bokmål: far

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

far

  1. second-person singular imperative active of fara

References edit

  • Zoëga, Geir T. (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic[2], Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Occitan edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin facere.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

far

  1. to do
    • c. 1130, Jaufre Rudel, canso:
      Dieus que fetz tot qunt ve ni vai / E formet sest'amor de lonh / Mi don poder [...].
      God, who makes everything that comes or goes and who created this distant love, give me power.

Descendants edit

Old Swedish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From (eastern) Old Norse *fāʀ (Old West Norse fær), from Proto-Germanic *fahaz.

Noun edit

fār n

  1. sheep

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin Pharus, French phare.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

far n (plural faruri)

  1. lighthouse
  2. (figuratively) beacon
  3. car headlight

Declension edit

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin faciō, facere.

Verb edit

far

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) to do, make

Conjugation edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology 1 edit

Possibly from Middle Irish i mbaile (where) from Old Irish baile (place) (with later early modern forms like a bhail a bhfuil, bhal a bhfuil) or from Old Irish fail (where), perhaps influenced by mar (as, like), related to Irish mar (where).

Adverb edit

far

  1. where (relative/non-interrogative)
    Bha e cunnartach far an robh am balach ag iasgach.It was dangerous where the boy was fishing.

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Clipping of de bhàrr

Alternative forms edit

Preposition edit

far (+ genitive)

  1. (down) from, off
    thuit e far eichhe fell off a horse

Spanish edit

Verb edit

far (first-person singular present fo, first-person singular preterite fe, past participle fado)

  1. Obsolete spelling of hacer

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Short for fader, from Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father).

Noun edit

far c

  1. father
Declension edit
Declension of far 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative far fadern fäder fäderna
Genitive fars faderns fäders fädernas
Derived terms edit

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

far

  1. inflection of fara:
    1. imperative
    2. present indicative

Etymology 3 edit

Short for farled.

Noun edit

far n

  1. (nautical) fairway

Anagrams edit

Turkish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from French phare.

Noun edit

far (definite accusative farı, plural farlar)

  1. headlight

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from French fard.

Noun edit

far (definite accusative farı, plural farlar)

  1. eye shadow
Declension edit
Inflection
Nominative far
Definite accusative farı
Singular Plural
Nominative far farlar
Definite accusative farı farları
Dative fara farlara
Locative farda farlarda
Ablative fardan farlardan
Genitive farın farların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular farım farlarım
2nd singular farın farların
3rd singular farı farları
1st plural farımız farlarımız
2nd plural farınız farlarınız
3rd plural farları farları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular farımı farlarımı
2nd singular farını farlarını
3rd singular farını farlarını
1st plural farımızı farlarımızı
2nd plural farınızı farlarınızı
3rd plural farlarını farlarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular farıma farlarıma
2nd singular farına farlarına
3rd singular farına farlarına
1st plural farımıza farlarımıza
2nd plural farınıza farlarınıza
3rd plural farlarına farlarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular farımda farlarımda
2nd singular farında farlarında
3rd singular farında farlarında
1st plural farımızda farlarımızda
2nd plural farınızda farlarınızda
3rd plural farlarında farlarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular farımdan farlarımdan
2nd singular farından farlarından
3rd singular farından farlarından
1st plural farımızdan farlarımızdan
2nd plural farınızdan farlarınızdan
3rd plural farlarından farlarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular farımın farlarımın
2nd singular farının farlarının
3rd singular farının farlarının
1st plural farımızın farlarımızın
2nd plural farınızın farlarınızın
3rd plural farlarının farlarının
Synonyms edit

Venetian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin facere.

Verb edit

far

  1. (transitive) to do, to make; to act, operate
  2. (transitive) to study

Volapük edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

far (nominative plural fars)

  1. lighthouse

Declension edit

See also edit