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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

abjure +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abjurer (plural abjurers)

  1. One who abjures. [From 16th century]
    • 1583, John Foxe, Actes and Monuments, London: John Daye, 4th edition, Volume 2, Book 7,[1]
      To thys Iames Morden with other moe abiurers, it was enioyned by Bishoppe Smith, for seuen yeares, to visite the church of Lincolne twise a yeare from Amersham.
    • 1655, William Prynne, A New Discovery of Free-State Tyranny, London: for the author, p. 25,[2]
      [] to force him by tedious uncomfortable imprisonments, and extreame penury to turn a practicall Apostate and perjured abjurer of all his former Orthodox loyall Principles []

TranslationsEdit



FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

ab- +‎ jurer, borrowed from Latin abiūrō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

abjurer

  1. (transitive, intransitive, very formal) To renounce or abandon solemnly; to abjure.
  2. (transitive, intransitive, religion) To formally renounce one's religious belief; to apostatise.
  3. (obsolete) To reject by oath someone's authority.

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit