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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aborigen (plural aborigens)

  1. Alternative form of aborigin [Attested from the early 17th century until the mid 19th century.][2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 4
  2. ^ “aborigen” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, ISBN 978-0-19-860457-0, page 6.

AnagramsEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin aborigines, from ab origine (originally).

NounEdit

aborigen

  1. aboriginal

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary][1], Simferopol: Dolya, ISBN 966-7980-89-8

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aboriginēs.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aboˈɾixen/, [aβoˈɾixẽn]

AdjectiveEdit

aborigen (plural aborígenes)

  1. aboriginal, indigenous, native

NounEdit

aborigen m, f (plural aborígenes)

  1. aborigine

Further readingEdit