accepta

See also: acceptà

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

accepta

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of acceptar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of acceptar

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

accepta

  1. third-person singular past historic of accepter

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

ParticipleEdit

accepta

  1. nominative feminine singular of acceptus
  2. nominative neuter plural of acceptus
  3. accusative neuter plural of acceptus
  4. vocative feminine singular of acceptus
  5. vocative neuter plural of acceptus

NounEdit

accepta f (genitive acceptae); first declension

  1. a portion of land granted by the state

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative accepta acceptae
Genitive acceptae acceptārum
Dative acceptae acceptīs
Accusative acceptam acceptās
Ablative acceptā acceptīs
Vocative accepta acceptae

ReferencesEdit

accepta in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

  • accepta in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • accepta in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden, Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co., 1894
    • (ambiguous) having exchanged pledges, promises: fide data et accepta (Sall. Iug. 81. 1)
    • (ambiguous) after mutual greeting: salute data (accepta) redditaque
    • (ambiguous) wounds (scars) on the breast: vulnera adverso corpore accepta

VerbEdit

acceptā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of acceptō

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French accepter, Latin acceptare.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ak.t͡ʃepˈta/
  • Rhymes: -a
  • Hyphenation: ac‧cep‧ta

VerbEdit

a accepta (third-person singular present acceptă, past participle acceptat1st conj.

  1. to accept
    Am acceptat destinul meu.
    I've accepted my fate.

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit