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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

accept +‎ -er; in the sense “respecter,” from Middle French accepteur.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accepter (plural accepters)

  1. A person who accepts; a taker.
  2. (obsolete) A respecter; one who views others with partiality.
    • 1395, John Wycliffe (translator), Bible, Acts 10.34,[4]
      And Petre openyde his mouth, and seide, In trewthe Y haue foundun, that God is no acceptor of persoones;
    • 1549, Hugh Latimer, The Seconde Sermon of Maister Hughe Latimer whych he preached before the Kynges maiestie, London: John Day and William Seres, To the Reader,[5]
      But nowe the wycked Iudge, whiche corrupteth iustyce for Brybes heer he maye learne also the lesson that Moses taughte long before this tyme, ye magistrates & Iudges in the common wealth of Israell be no accepters of personnes neyther be desyreous of giftes, for they make wyse men blind, and chaunge the mynde of the ryghtuouse.
    • early 1700s, William Chillingworth, Sermon on Psalm 14.1 in The Works of William Chillingworth, London: Richard Priestley, 1820, Volume 3, p. 92,[6]
      [] God is no accepter of persons, neither riches nor poverty are a means to procure his favour []
  3. (law) An acceptor; one who accepts an order or a bill of exchange.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ accepteur in Trésor de la langue française informatisé

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French accepter, from Old French accepter, borrowed from Latin acceptō, acceptāre.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ak.sɛp.te/
  • (file)
  • (file)

VerbEdit

accepter

  1. (transitive) to accept
    je vais accepter votre offre - I'm going to accept your offer
    il accepte de s'arrêter - he agreed to stop

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French accepter.

VerbEdit

accepter

  1. to accept

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin acceptō, acceptāre.

VerbEdit

accepter

  1. to accept

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. In the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

accepter

  1. indefinite plural of accept