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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin acroāma.

NounEdit

acroama (plural acroamata)

  1. rhetorical declamation
  2. esoteric teaching that was not to be written down

ReferencesEdit

  • OED 2nd edition 1989

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀκρόαμα (akróama, something heard).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acroāma n (genitive acroāmatis); third declension

  1. Anything heard, especially anything heard for entertainment, such as a play or musical piece.
  2. performer, such as an actor or musician.

InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative acroāma acroāmata
genitive acroāmatis acroāmatum
dative acroāmatī acroāmatibus
accusative acroāma acroāmata
ablative acroāmate acroāmatibus
vocative acroāma acroāmata

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • acroama in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • acroama in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “acroama”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • acroama in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • acroama in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin