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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin acroāma.

NounEdit

acroama (plural acroamata)

  1. rhetorical declamation
  2. esoteric teaching that was not to be written down

ReferencesEdit

  • OED 2nd edition 1989

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀκρόαμα (akróama, something heard).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acroāma n (genitive acroāmatis); third declension

  1. Anything heard, especially anything heard for entertainment, such as a play or musical piece.
  2. performer, such as an actor or musician.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • acroama in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • acroama in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “acroama”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • acroama in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • acroama in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin