LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

altum n (genitive altī); second declension

  1. the deep, the sea

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative altum alta
Genitive altī altōrum
Dative altō altīs
Accusative altum alta
Ablative altō altīs
Vocative altum alta

ParticipleEdit

altum

  1. nominative neuter singular of altus
  2. accusative masculine singular of altus
  3. accusative neuter singular of altus
  4. vocative neuter singular of altus

VerbEdit

altum

  1. accusative supine of alō

ReferencesEdit

  • altum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • altum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • altum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • altum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) the tide is coming in: aestus ex alto se incitat (B. G. 3.12)
    • (ambiguous) to study the commonplace: cogitationes in res humiles abicere (De Amic. 9. 32) (Opp. alte spectare, ad altiora tendere, altum, magnificum, divinum suspicere)
    • (ambiguous) what he said made a deep impression on..: hoc verbum alte descendit in pectus alicuius
    • (ambiguous) to go a long way back (in narrative): longe, alte (longius, altius) repetere (either absolute or ab aliqua re)
    • (ambiguous) to put to sea: vela in altum dare (Liv. 25. 27)
    • (ambiguous) the storm drives some one on an unknown coast: procella (tempestas) aliquem ex alto ad ignotas terras (oras) defert
    • (ambiguous) to make fast boats to anchors: naves (classem) constituere (in alto)