apocopate

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin apocopātus (cut off), from Ancient Greek ἀποκόπτω (apokóptō, cut off).

AdjectiveEdit

apocopate (not comparable)

  1. Shortened by apocope; lacking a final sound or syllable

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

apocopate (third-person singular simple present apocopates, present participle apocopating, simple past and past participle apocopated)

  1. (linguistics) To shorten using apocope; to remove the final sound or syllable.
    • 1904, Robert Sterling, A Grammar of the Arabic Language, London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co, OCLC 3088363, page 229:
      The particles which apocopate the final vowel of the aorist are of two kinds: I. Those which apocopate the final vowel of one verb only. II. Those which apocopate the final vowel of two verbs.
  2. (linguistics, intransitive) To undergo apocope.
    • 1999, The Best Test Preparation for the SAT II, Subject Test: Spanish, Piscataway, NJ: Research & Education Association, →ISBN, page R-195:
      "Ciento" apocopates to "cien" before nouns or numbers larger than itself.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

apocopate (uncountable)

  1. A verb form of the prefix conjugation in Semitic which bears no final vowel and is considered the original perfective, but often called jussive mood.

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

apocopate

  1. inflection of apocopare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of apocopato