Open main menu

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant form of oppose.

VerbEdit

appose (third-person singular simple present apposes, present participle apposing, simple past and past participle apposed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To interrogate; to question.
    • c. 1385, William Langland, Piers Plowman, III:
      I shal assaye hir my-self · and sothelich appose / What man of þis worlde · þat hire were leueste.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.9:
      Then gan Authority her to appose / With peremptorie powre […].

Etymology 2Edit

Coined based on Latin appōnō, by analogy with compose, suppose etc.

VerbEdit

appose (third-person singular simple present apposes, present participle apposing, simple past and past participle apposed)

  1. (transitive) To place next or to or near to; to juxtapose.
  2. (transitive) To place opposite or before; to put or apply (one thing to another).
    • Chapman
      The nymph herself did then appose, / For food and beverage, to him all best meat.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

FrenchEdit

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

appose

  1. third-person singular past historic of apporre

AnagramsEdit