question

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English question, questioun, questiun, from Anglo-Norman questiun, from Old French question, from Latin quaestiōnem, accusative of quaestiō (a seeking, investigation, inquiry, question), from quaerere (to seek, ask, inquire).[1] Displaced native Old English āscung. Compare also Middle Low German quēstie (questioning; inquiry), Middle High German questje (question).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkwɛst͡ʃən/, /ˈkwɛstjən/, /ˈkwɛʃt͡ʃən/
  • (US also) IPA(key): /ˈkwɛʃtən/
  • (Indian English) IPA(key): /ˈkwɛst͡ʃɛn/, /ˈkwɛʃ(t͡ʃ)ɛn/
  • Hyphenation: ques‧tion
  • (file)

NounEdit

question (plural questions)

  1. A sentence, phrase or word which asks for information, reply or response; an interrogative.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 4, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I told him about everything I could think of; and what I couldn't think of he did. He asked about six questions during my yarn, but every question had a point to it. At the end he bowed and thanked me once more. As a thanker he was main-truck high; I never see anybody so polite.
    What is your question?
  2. A subject or topic for consideration or investigation.
    The question of seniority will be discussed at the meeting.
    There was a question of which material to use.
    • 2014 October 14, David Malcolm, “The Great War Re-Remembered: Allohistory and Allohistorical Fiction”, in Martin Löschnigg; Marzena Sokolowska-Paryz, editors, The Great War in Post-Memory Literature and Film[1], Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG., →ISBN, page 173:
      The question of the plausibility of the counter-factual is seen as key in all three discussions of allohistorical fiction (as it is in Demandt's and Ferguson's examinations of allohistory) (cf. Rodiek 25–26; Ritter 15–16; Helbig 32).
  3. A doubt or challenge about the truth, accuracy, or validity of a matter.
    His claim to the property has come under question.
    The story is true beyond question.
    He obeyed without question.
    • There arose a question between some of John's disciples and the Jews about purifying.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, An Advertisement touching an Holy War
      It is to be to question, whether it be lawful for Christian princes or states to make an invasive war, only and simply for the propagation of the faith.
    • 2021 April 2, Ciara Nugent, “Can Public Transit Survive the Pandemic? London's New Transport Commissioner Wants You to Believe It Can”, in Time[2]:
      The pandemic has not only caused an immediate fall in ticket revenues for the world’s public transit networks—rail ridership in Barcelona, Moscow, Beijing and New York City at times plummeting 80%—in some cities it also has thrown into question the future of mass urban transportation.
  4. A proposal to a meeting as a topic for deliberation.
    I move that the question be put to a vote.
  5. (now archaic, historical, chiefly with definite article) Interrogation by torture.
  6. (obsolete) Talk; conversation; speech.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

question (third-person singular simple present questions, present participle questioning, simple past and past participle questioned)

  1. (transitive) To ask questions of; to interrogate; to ask for information.
    • 1836, Frederick W. Thomas, East and West, volume 2:
      Yet he lingered in Perryville with the determination of seeing Ruth, and questioning her about Helen Murray's letters.
    • 2019, Nic Pizzolatto, “The Hour and the Day”, in True Detective, season 3, episode 4:
      Another former resident noticed the car because it was new and upscale and no one ever came back to question him. This points to serious flaws in the investigation from the beginning.
  2. (transitive) To raise doubts about; have doubts about.
    • 2019, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      He questioned South Korean claims that China is a major source of its pollution.
      (file)
  3. (intransitive) To ask a question or questions; inquire or seek to know; examine.[1]
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To argue; to converse; to dispute.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 question in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French question, borrowed from Latin quaestiō, quaestiōnem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

question f (plural questions)

  1. a question
    Je voudrais vous poser une question.
    I would like to ask you a question.
  2. a matter or issue; a problem

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

question (plural questiones)

  1. question

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

question

  1. Alternative form of questioun

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin quaestiō, quaestiōnem.

NounEdit

question f (oblique plural questions, nominative singular question, nominative plural questions)

  1. question (verbal statement intended to elicit a response)
  2. question (problem in need of resolution)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit